So, how’s the Hall of Fame voting going so far?

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Every year my friend Repoz over at Baseball Think Factory keeps track of the Hall of Fame balloting via his “HOF Ballot Collecting Gizmo!”  It’s a nice snapshot of what voters who have made their ballots public thus far are doing. At the moment, with 14.4% of the vote in (based on last year’s number of votes) here’s the tally, in percentages:

100 – Maddux
98.8 – Glavine
87.8 – F. Thomas
82.9 – Biggio
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74.4 – Piazza
64.6 – Bagwell
62.2 – Jack (The Jack) Morris
56.1 – Raines
46.3 – Bonds
45.1 – Clemens
41.5 – Schilling
34.1 – Mussina
23.2 – L. Smith
23.2 – Trammell
18.3 – E. Martinez
15.9 – McGriff
12.2 – Kent
11.0 – L. Walker
11.0 – McGwire
7.3 – R. Palmeiro
7.3 – S. Sosa
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3.7 – Mattingly
1.2 – P. Rose (Write-In)

Worth noting that, because these votes come mostly from active baseball writers with online presences, Repoz’s tracker has tended to overrepresent totals for more SABR-friendly candidates, for lack of a better term. The non-baseball writers who still, inexplicably, have a Hall of Fame vote, and those who don’t feel it reasonable to share their voting with the public tend to skew a tad less enlightened. Again, for lack of a better term. Practically speaking, this means that you can expect an uptick for Jack Morris and a downtick for guys like Tim Raines and, of course, the PED-associated players.

But it’s fun anyway.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.