Puig’s reckless driving is a concern, but . . .

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. . . I feel like Plaschke’s response to it all is a bit overwrought:

A white Mercedes allegedly traveling 110 mph has flattened the Dodgers with the organization’s most frightening, frustrating truth.

The richest team in baseball cannot buy the safety, security or even the simple undivided attention of its most popular player.

Yasiel Puig continues to careen toward calamity and there doesn’t seem to be anything anybody can, or will, do about it.

I don’t disagree with the notion that Puig needs to slow it the heck down and if I’m running the Dodgers I have a heart-to-heart with him about making smart decisions. But the Dodgers don’t sound “flattened” based on their response. Their response seems to be pretty level-headed: In essence “a young kid is driving too fast and he needs to cut it out. We can’t babysit him 24/7. He needs to make some grownup decisions.”  Sounds about right to me.

Plashcke paints this as far more dire than it is, however, and it’s hard not to see this as his continuing hyper-criticism of and alarmism regarding Puig. If it’s not, tell me what this paragraph is doing in there:

Puig batted just .214 in the season’s final month. Then, after playing well in the National League division series win against the Atlanta Braves, he collapsed in the NL Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, batting just .227 with one extra base hit while committing three fielding blunders in the Cardinals’ clinching Game 6 victory.

It has no logical flow to the argument that he’s making at the time. Indeed, the argument — all about Puig’s maturity — flows far better without that in there. But he has to get a shot in. He has to imply, however subtly, that Puig’s off-the-field demeanor is dictating his on-the-field performance. He has to try to find a way to add heft to his criticisms of Puig, lest they appear to be mere hand-wringing.

Again: Puig is being an idiot at the wheel and he needs to not do crap that risks his health and life. But a lead foot is not worthy of a full-blown character indictment and is certainly not something that feeds into his baseball ability the way Plaschke would have you think it is.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.