Puig’s reckless driving is a concern, but . . .

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. . . I feel like Plaschke’s response to it all is a bit overwrought:

A white Mercedes allegedly traveling 110 mph has flattened the Dodgers with the organization’s most frightening, frustrating truth.

The richest team in baseball cannot buy the safety, security or even the simple undivided attention of its most popular player.

Yasiel Puig continues to careen toward calamity and there doesn’t seem to be anything anybody can, or will, do about it.

I don’t disagree with the notion that Puig needs to slow it the heck down and if I’m running the Dodgers I have a heart-to-heart with him about making smart decisions. But the Dodgers don’t sound “flattened” based on their response. Their response seems to be pretty level-headed: In essence “a young kid is driving too fast and he needs to cut it out. We can’t babysit him 24/7. He needs to make some grownup decisions.”  Sounds about right to me.

Plashcke paints this as far more dire than it is, however, and it’s hard not to see this as his continuing hyper-criticism of and alarmism regarding Puig. If it’s not, tell me what this paragraph is doing in there:

Puig batted just .214 in the season’s final month. Then, after playing well in the National League division series win against the Atlanta Braves, he collapsed in the NL Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, batting just .227 with one extra base hit while committing three fielding blunders in the Cardinals’ clinching Game 6 victory.

It has no logical flow to the argument that he’s making at the time. Indeed, the argument — all about Puig’s maturity — flows far better without that in there. But he has to get a shot in. He has to imply, however subtly, that Puig’s off-the-field demeanor is dictating his on-the-field performance. He has to try to find a way to add heft to his criticisms of Puig, lest they appear to be mere hand-wringing.

Again: Puig is being an idiot at the wheel and he needs to not do crap that risks his health and life. But a lead foot is not worthy of a full-blown character indictment and is certainly not something that feeds into his baseball ability the way Plaschke would have you think it is.

Jered Weaver announces his retirement

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Jered Weaver, a 12-year big league veteran and a three-time All-Star, has announced his retirement.

Weaver was struggling mightily with the Padres this year, going 0-5 in nine starts and posting a 7.44 ERA,, a 2.6 BB/9 and 4.9 K/9 ratio over 42.1 innings. He hadn’t posted a sub-4.00 ERA since 2014 and his velocity had, quite famously, sunk into the low 80s and even high 70s at times in recent seasons. A spate of physical setbacks contributed to that, with a hip inflammation ailing him this season and nerve issues in his neck and back afflicting him for the past few years.

But even if his recent seasons have been less-than-memorable, it’s worth remembering that he was, for a time, one of baseball’s best pitchers. He posted a record of 131-69 with a 3.28 ERA in his first 9 seasons, leading the American League in strikeouts in 2010 and leading the circuit in wins in 2012 and 2014. He likewise led the league in WHIP and hits allowed per nine innings in 2012.

He finishes his career with a record of 150-98, an ERA of 3.63 (ERA+ of 111) and a K/BB ratio of 1,621/551 in 2,067.1 innings. He pitched in four American League Division Series and the 2009 ALCS, posting a 2.67 ERA in seven playoff games pitched.

Happy trails, Jered. A first-ballot induction into the Hall of He Was Really Dang Good, Even if We Forgot About It For A While is in your future.

The Jose Fernandez statue may be in jeopardy

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Last November it was reported that the Marlins planned to build a memorial for Jose Fernandez, likely including a statue. The effort was said to be a pet project of the Marlins owner, Jeff Loria, who was close with Fernandez.

Today the Miami Herald reports, however, that those plans are in limbo due to the sale of the team:

The planned statue to honor Jose Fernandez, which was departing owner Jeffrey Loria’s idea, is now very much in question because it will not be erected before Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter take over, and it will ultimately be the new owners’ call. That matter has not yet been discussed, with the sale agreed to only in the past few days.

There’s nothing in the report suggesting that they’re opposed to the statue — it’s possible this was placed in the Herald by people close to the new group in order to test the waters — but there always was the sense that the idea was something of a priority for Loria personally. One wonders how much momentum it will have once he’s gone.

Then, of course, there’s the fact that Fernandez was eventually found to have been under the influence of alcohol and cocaine and was behind the wheel of the boat at the time of the accident that claimed his life and the life of two others, making any memorial to him suspect in the eyes of some people.

Thankfully we don’t spend a lot of time and energy discussing the ethics of statues in this country, so I’m sure it’ll have no bearing on the matter.