It’s “Oh, how heavy a burden it is to vote for the Hall of Fame” season

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I think my least favorite type of baseball columns are the ones in which the writer talks about the heavy, heavy burden of his Hall of Fame vote. We’re baseball writers for Pete’s sake. We’re not making life or death decisions. Not that you’d know it from some of these pieces, though. Check out Steve Simmons’ heavy, heavy burden:

Every year seems to get more difficult, more complicated, more conflicted and less certain about voting for the Baseball Hall of Fame and every year I make a list and scratch names off it, then make another list and do the same again. All the while, wrestling with what you perceive to be right and wrong, what your own beliefs happens to be, angry that baseball has left the writers to play the part of jury and all the while trying to find balance between what you believe, what you witnessed, what you think you know, what prejudices you may have, real or imagined, what you have determined statistically — with new stats and old stats.

What follows are several paragraphs of PED/Hall of Fame/Oh-my-this-is-so-morally-vexing wankery. After which Simmons decides that he can’t vote for PED guys for the Hall of Fame. Which is fine if that’s how you roll with the PED issue. I disagree with it, but as long as someone is consistent with their approach and doesn’t make baseless assumptions and crap, all I’ll do is disagree. It won’t get me too bent out of shape.

But what I really don’t get is, if you are an anti-PED voter, what’s so hard about this? If anything, it should be pretty easy. You’ve made a moral judgment, apply it. All of the self-flagellation about it seems like silly drama designed to fill column inches.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. lays out to make a great catch in deep right-center field

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Cubs center fielder Albert Almora, Jr. robbed Giants first baseman Brandon Belt of at least a double in the top of the first inning of Monday’s game at Wrigley Field. Almora completely left his feet to catch the ball before landing just shy of the warning track.

The Giants took the early lead two batters prior to Belt’s at-bat as Joe Panik hit a solo home run to center field.