MLB: Yankees-Brian McCann Press Conference

2014 Free Agent Tracker

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Here’s the rundown of where this winter’s top 150 free agents are landing, continuously updated throughout the offseason. Re-signings are posted in red, while players signing with new teams are in blue.

Stars denote players who received qualifying offers and thus will cost their new team a draft pick if they sign elsewhere.

(Non-tenders have been added to the list, noted with an NT.)

All ages are as of April 1, 2014.

1. Robinson Cano (2B Yankees, 31)*: Mariners – 10 years, $240 million
2. Jacoby Ellsbury (OF Red Sox, 30)*: Yankees – seven years, $153 million
x. Masahiro Tanaka (RHP Japan, 25): Yankees – seven years, $155 million
3. Shin-Soo Choo (OF Reds, 31)*: Rangers – seven years, $130 million
4. Matt Garza (RHP Rangers, 30): Brewers – four years, $50 mil + $13 mil vesting option
5. Ervin Santana (RHP Royals, 31)*:
6. Ubaldo Jimenez (RHP Indians, 29)*:
7. Brian McCann (C Braves, 30)*: Yankees – five years, $85 mil + option
8. Curtis Granderson (OF Yankees, 33)*: Mets – four years, $60 million
9. Carlos Beltran (OF Cardinals, 36)*: Yankees – three years, $45 million
10. Hiroki Kuroda (RHP Yankees, 39)*: Yankees – one year, $16 million
11. A.J. Burnett (RHP Pirates, 37):
12. Nelson Cruz (OF Rangers, 33)*:
13. Mike Napoli (1B Red Sox, 32)*: Red Sox – two years, $32 million
14. Tim Hudson (RHP Braves, 38): Giants – two years, $23 million
15. Stephen Drew (SS Red Sox, 31)*:
16. Bronson Arroyo (RHP Reds, 37):
17. Jarrod Saltalamacchia (C Red Sox, 28): Marlins – three years, $21 million
18. Joe Nathan (RHP Rangers, 39): Tigers – two years, $20 mil + option
19. Bartolo Colon (RHP Athletics, 40): Mets – two years, $20 million
20. Ricky Nolasco (RHP Dodgers, 31): Twins – four years, $49 million + option
21. Jason Vargas (LHP Angels, 31): Royals – four years, $32 million
22. Kendrys Morales (1B-DH Mariners, 30)*:
23. Brian Wilson (RHP Dodgers, 32): Dodgers – one year, $10 mil + player option
24. Dan Haren (RHP Nationals, 33): Dodgers – one year, $10 mil + vesting option
25. Scott Kazmir (LHP Indians, 30): Athletics – two years, $22 million
26. Phil Hughes (RHP Yankees, 27): Twins – three years, $24 million
27. Jhonny Peralta (SS Tigers, 31): Cardinals – four years, $53 million
28. Grant Balfour (RHP Athletics, 36): Rays – two years, $12 million
29. Scott Feldman (RHP Orioles, 31): Astros – three years, $30 million
30. Corey Hart (1B-OF Brewers, 32): Mariners – one year, $6 mil ($7 mil incentives)
31. Josh Johnson (RHP Blue Jays, 30): Padres – one year, $8 million
32. Paul Maholm (LHP Braves, 31):
33. James Loney (1B Rays, 29): Rays – three years, $21 million
34. Omar Infante (2B Tigers, 32): Royals – four years, $30.25 million
35. Joaquin Benoit (RHP Tigers, 36): Padres – two years, $15.5 million
36. Fernando Rodney (RHP Rays, 37):
37. Marlon Byrd (OF Pirates, 36): Phillies – two years, $16 mil + vesting option
38. Carlos Ruiz (C Phillies, 35): Phillies – three years, $26 million + option
39. Chris Young (OF Athletics, 30): Mets – one year, $7.25 million
40. Suk-Min Yoon (RHP Korea, 27):
x. Yoshio Itoi (OF Japan, 32): Won’t be posted
41. Roy Halladay (RHP Phillies, 36): Retired
42. Joe Smith (RHP Indians, 30): Angels – three years, $15.75 million
43. Derek Jeter (SS Yankees, 39): Yankees – one year, $12 million
44. Scott Baker (RHP Cubs, 32): Mariners – minor league deal ($1 mil + $3.25 mil incentives)
45. A.J. Pierzynski (C Rangers, 37): Red Sox – one year, $8.25 million
46. Randy Messenger (RHP Japan, 32): Staying in Japan – three-year deal
47. Jesse Crain (RHP Rays, 32): Astros – one year, $3.25 million
48. Wandy Rodriguez (LHP Pirates, 35): Pirates – exercised $13 mil player option
49. David Murphy (OF Rangers, 32): Indians – two years, $12 mil + option
50. Edward Mujica (RHP Cardinals, 29): Red Sox – two years, $9.5 million
51. Kevin Youkilis (1B-3B Yankees, 35): Signed to play in Japan
52. Chris Perez (RHP Indians, 28): Dodgers – one year, $2.3 million ($4 mil incentives)
53. Michael Morse (OF Orioles, 31): Giants – one year, $6 million
54. Justin Morneau (1B Pirates, 32): Rockies – two years, $13 million
55. Javier Lopez (LHP Giants, 36): Giants – three years, $13 million
56. J.P. Howell (LHP Dodgers, 30): Dodgers – two years, $11.25 mil + mutual option
57. David DeJesus (OF Rays, 34): Rays – two years, $10.5 mil + option
58. Mark Ellis (2B Dodgers, 36): Cardinals – one year, $5.25 million
59. Boone Logan (LHP Yankees, 29): Rockies – three years, $16.5 million
60. Jason Hammel (RHP Orioles, 31): Cubs – one year, $6 million
61. Bruce Chen (LHP Royals, 36): Royals – one year, $4.25 mil + $5.5 mil mutual option
62. Francisco Rodriguez (RHP Orioles, 32):
63. Juan Uribe (3B Dodgers, 35): Dodgers – two years, $15 million
64. Jake Westbrook (RHP Cardinals, 36):
65. Chris Capuano (LHP Dodgers, 35):
66. Carlos Marmol (RHP Dodgers, 31):
67. Dioner Navarro (C Cubs, 30): Blue Jays – two years, $8 million
68. Kelly Johnson (2B-OF Rays, 32): Yankees – one year, $3 million
69. Ryan Vogelsong (RHP Giants, 36): Giants – one year, $5 mil + $2.5 mil incentives
70. Manny Parra (LHP Reds, 31): Reds – two years, $5.5 million
70 1/2. Jose Veras (RHP Tigers, 33): Cubs – one year, $4 million + option
71. Colby Lewis (RHP Rangers, 34): Rangers – minor league deal ($2 mil + $4 mil incentives)
72. Eric Chavez (3B Diamondbacks, 36): Diamondbacks – one year,$3.5 mil + $1 mil incentives
NT. Garrett Jones (1B-OF Pirates, 32): Marlins – two years, $7.75 million
73. Michael Young (INF Dodgers, 37): Retired
74. Joe Saunders (LHP Mariners, 32):
75. Nate McLouth (OF Orioles, 32): Nationals – two years, $10.75 mil + option
76. Chad Gaudin (RHP Giants, 31): Phillies – minor league deal ($750,000)
77. Mark Reynolds (1B-3B Yankees, 30): Brewers – minor league deal ($2 mil + $500,000 incentives)
78. Scott Downs (LHP Braves, 38): White Sox – one year, $4 mil + vesting $4 mil option
79. Mike Pelfrey (RHP Twins, 30): Twins – two years, $11 million
NT: John Axford (RHP Cardinals, 31): Indians – one year, $4.5 million
80. Paul Konerko (1B White Sox, 38): White Sox – one year, $2.5 million
81. Gavin Floyd (RHP White Sox, 31): Braves – one year, $4 mil ($4.5 mil incentives)
82. Joba Chamberlain (RHP Yankees, 28): Tigers – one year, $2.5 million
83. Eric O’Flaherty (LHP Braves, 28): Athletics – two years, $7 million
84. Brian Roberts (2B Orioles, 35): Yankees – one year, $2 million
85. Kurt Suzuki (C Athletics, 30): Twins – one year, $2.75 million
86. Raul Ibanez (OF-DH Mariners, 41): Angels – one year, $2.75 million
87. Joel Hanrahan (RHP Red Sox, 32):
88. Matt Belisle (RHP Rockies, 33): Rockies – one year, $4.25 mil (option exercised)
89. Oliver Perez (LHP Mariners, 32):
90. Rafael Furcal (SS Cardinals, 36): Marlins – one year, $3 million
NT. Ronald Belisario (RHP Dodgers, 31): White Sox – one year, $3 million
91. Geovany Soto (C Rangers, 31): Rangers – one year, $3.05 million
NT. Jerome Williams (RHP Angels, 32):
92. Jason Kubel (OF-DH Indians, 31): Twins – minor league contract ($2 mil + $1 mil incentives)
NT. Ryan Webb (RHP Marlins, 28): Orioles – two years, $4.5 million
NT. J.P. Arencibia (C Blue Jays, 28): Rangers – one year, $1.8 mil + $300,00o incentives
93. Chris Carpenter (RHP Cardinals, 38): Retired
94. Franklin Gutierrez (OF Mariners, 31): Mariners – one year, $1 million
95. Jamey Wright (RHP Rays, 39): Dodgers – one year, $1.8 million
96. Edinson Volquez (RHP Dodgers, 30): Pirates – one year, $5 million
97. Rajai Davis (OF Blue Jays, 33): Tigers – two years, $10 million
98. Shaun Marcum (RHP Mets, 32): Indians – minor league deal ($1 mil + $3 mil incentives)
99. John Buck (C Pirates, 33): Mariners – one year, $1 million
100. Matt Thornton (LHP Red Sox, 37): Yankees – two years, $7 million
101. Lance Berkman (DH Rangers, 38): Retired
102. Roberto Hernandez (RHP Rays, 33): Phillies – one year, $4.5 million
103. Jeff Baker (INF-OF Rangers, 32):
104. Kevin Gregg (RHP Cubs, 35):
105. Takashi Toritani (INF Japan, 32): Remained in Japan
106. Erik Bedard (LHP Astros, 35):
107. Skip Schumaker (2B-OF Dodgers, 34): Reds – two years, $5 million
108. LaTroy Hawkins (RHP Mets, 41): Rockies – one year, $2.5 mil + option
109. Tim Stauffer (RHP Padres, 31):
110. Ryan Madson (RHP FA, 33):
111. Clint Barmes (SS Pirates, 35): Pirates – one year, $2 million
112. Willie Bloomquist (INF Diamondbacks, 36): Mariners – two years, $5.8 million
113. Delmon Young (OF-DH Rays, 28): Orioles – minor league deal ($1 mil +$750,000 incentives)
114. Ted Lilly (LHP FA, 38): Retired
115. Luke Scott (OF Rays, 35): Signed to play in Korea
116. Jose Molina (C Rays, 38): Rays – two years, $4.5 million
117. Brendan Ryan (SS Yankees, 32): Yankees – two years, $5 mil + option
118. Johan Santana (LHP Mets, 35):
119. Michael Gonzalez (LHP Brewers, 35):
120. Nick Punto (INF Dodgers, 36): Athletics – one year, $3 mil + option
121. Chad Qualls (RHP Marlins, 35): Astros – two years, $6 mil + option
122. Brayan Pena (C Tigers, 32): Reds – two years, undisclosed sum
NT. Andrew Bailey (RHP Red Sox, 29):
123. Aaron Harang (RHP Mets, 35):
124. Luis Ayala (RHP Braves, 36):
125. Jerry Hairston Jr. (INF-OF Dodgers, 37): Retired
126. Juan Carlos Oviedo (RHP Rays, 32): Rays – one year, $1.5 million
NT. Daniel Hudson (RHP Diamondbacks, 27): Diamondbacks – minor league deal
127. Kyle Farnsworth (RHP Pirates, 37):
128. Barry Zito (LHP Giants, 35):
129. David Aardsma (RHP Mets, 32): Indians – minor league deal ($1 million)
NT. Wesley Wright (LHP Rays, 29): Cubs – one year, $1.425 million
130. Yuniesky Betancourt (INF Brewers, 32): Signed to play in Japan
131. Alfredo Aceves (RHP Red Sox, 32): Orioles – minor league deal ($1.2 mil + $1.8 mil incentives)
132. Placido Polanco (3B Marlins, 37):
133. Daisuke Matsuzaka (RHP Mets, 33): Mets – minor league deal ($1.5 million)
134. Wilson Betemit (3B FA, 32): Rays – minor league deal
NT. Jayson Nix (INF Yankees, 31): Rays – minor league deal
135. Brett Myers (RHP Indians, 33):
136. Jeff Karstens (RHP Pirates, 31):
137. Roy Oswalt (RHP Rockies, 36):
138. Juan Pierre (OF Marlins, 36):
139. Octavio Dotel (RHP Tigers, 40):
140. Frank Francisco (RHP Mets, 34):
NT. Tommy Hanson (RHP Angels, 27):
141. Clayton Richard (LHP Padres, 30):
142. Reed Johnson (OF Braves, 37): Marlins – minor league deal
143. Wil Nieves (C Diamondbacks, 36): Phillies – one year, $1.125 million
144. Grady Sizemore (OF FA, 31): Red Sox – one year, $750,000 ($5.25 mil incentives)
145. Tsuyoshi Wada (LHP Orioles, 33): Cubs – minor league contract
NT. Lou Marson (C Indians, 27): Phillies – minor league contract
146. Yorvit Torrealba (C Rockies, 35):
147. John Lannan (LHP Phillies, 29): Mets – minor league contract ($1.5 mil)
148. Andres Torres (OF Giants, 36):
149. Jamey Carroll (INF Royals, 40): Nationals – minor league contract
150. Rich Hill (LHP Indians, 34):

Signed pre-rankings:

Jose Abreu (1B Cuba): White Sox – six years, $68 million
Tim Lincecum (RHP Giants): Giants – two years, $35 million
Alexander Guerrero (INF Cuba): Dodgers – four years, $28 million
Ryan Sweeney (OF Cubs): Cubs – two years, $3.5 million + option
Jason Frasor (RHP Rangers): Rangers – one year, $1.5 million

Other signings:

Matt Albers (RHP Indians): Astros – one year, $2.45 million + option
Felipe Paulino (RHP Royals): White Sox – one year, $1.75 million
Casey McGehee (3B Japan): Marlins – one year, $1.1 million
David Cooper (1B FA): Indians – one year, undisclosed sum
Jason Giambi (DH Indians): Indians – minor league contract
Munenori Kawasaki (2B Blue Jays): Blue Jays – minor league contract
Jonathan Sanchez (LHP FA): Cubs – minor league contract
Chris Snyder (C Orioles): Nationals – minor league contract
Chien-Ming Wang (RHP FA): Reds – minor league contract

Chris Young (RHP Nationals): Nationals – minor league contract

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

ST. LOUIS, MO - SEPTEMBER 29: Rain falls during a game between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Cincinnati Reds at Busch Stadium on September 29, 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights.

Oh, and here is my take on the idiotic ending to the Reds-Cardinals game which could potentially cost the Giants a playoff berth.

Nationals 5, Diamondbacks 3: Wilmer Difo hit his first major league homer. Pedro Severino hit his second. No National succumbed to season-ending injuries. So a rare success for Washington in these final days of the regular season.

Yankees 5, Red Sox 1: CC Sabathia allowed one run and four hits while pitching into the eighth inning. It was only his ninth win of the year — his first win in a month — but he lowered his ERA to 3.91. He strike out fewer guys than he used to, walks more and allows more hits. But the fact that he made 30 starts this year and made at least a modest return to form suggests that, maybe, Sabathia still has something in the tank. Not as an ace, of course, but at least as a guy who can give you some respectable innings at the back of a rotation. In other news, the Yankees were eliminated in the middle of this game by virtue of the Orioles beating the Blue Jays. Inevitable, but the mere fact that they staved off elimination until game 159 is pretty impressive given all that has happened this year.

Cubs 1, Pirates 1: You don’t see many ties in baseball. Unless it’s spring training. Or, like, 1912 or something and it gets dark. Thank Mother Nature for the game being called at 1-1. Thank this game having no playoff implications whatsoever for it not being resumed at a later date. It was the first tie in a regular season game since 2005.

Orioles 4, Blue Jays 0: Ubaldo Jimenez and two relievers combined on a three-hit shutout. Jimenez allowed one of those hits in his six and two-thirds innings. The O’s and Jays are tied in the Wild Card standings with Detroit (1.5 back) and Seattle (2 back) the only ones left who can break up their postseason party.

Braves 5, Phillies 2Freddie Freeman‘s 30-game hitting streak ended but the Braves won for the 10th time in 11 games. The Tigers play Atlanta in the season’s final series. A month or two ago that looked like a nice way to end things. Right now, however, there’s a decent chance that the Braves help end the Tigers season. If that comes to pass, please say a prayer for those Braves fans you know who are engaged to grumpy Tigers fans come Sunday. Not, um, that I know any of those.

Twins 7, Royals 6:

screen-shot-2016-09-30-at-6-51-30-am

Same.

Cardinals 4, Reds 3: Not sure what else there is to say at this point that I didn’t say here. I dunno, Yadier Molina and Jedd Gyorko hit solo homers. Wheeeeeee.

Rays 5, White Sox 3: Congratulations to Chris Archer for avoiding his 20th loss of the season. Pitcher wins and losses mean little about the skill or prowess of a pitcher, but it’s better not to be the answer to a trivia question like that.

Dodgers 9, Padres 4Joc Pederson doubled twice and drove in three as the Dodgers avoided a sweep. The Dodgers are two games behind the Nationals with three to play in the race for home-field advantage in their division series matchup. Between that and possibly keeping the Giants out of the Wild Card game, they have a lot to play for this weekend in San Francisco.

Mariners 3, Athletics 2: Mike Zunino hit a go-ahead home run in the seventh inning to keep the Mariners alive for at least one more day.

Giants 7, Rockies 2: Johnny Cueto started out a bit shaky, giving up two in the top of the first, but he settled down and didn’t allow anything else in his remaining six innings. It was close until the sixth when the San Francisco pulled ahead, thanks in part to an uncharacteristic defensive blunder by Nolan Arenado. The Giants control their own destiny in the Wild Card, standing a game ahead of St. Louis with three to play.

Indians vs. Tigers: POSTPONED: The leaves of brown came tumbling down

Remember in September in the rain
The sun went out just like a dying amber
That September in the rain

To every word of love i heard you whisper
The raindrops seemed to play our sweet refrain
Though spring is here to me it’s still September
That September in the rain

The idiocy of baseball’s replay system was on full display in St. Louis last night

ST. LOUIS, MO - SEPTEMBER 29: Matt Carpenter #13 of the St. Louis Cardinals scores the game-winning run against the Cincinnati Reds in the ninth inning at Busch Stadium on September 29, 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
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Baseball’s current instant replay system, in place since the beginning of the 2014 season, has experienced hiccups, but it has generally avoided extreme controversy or high profile failures. Last night in St. Louis, however, the replay system failed in spectacular fashion, potentially costing a team a playoff berth.

We wrote about the play last night: bottom of the ninth in a tied Reds-Cardinals game, Matt Carpenter on first base, Yadier Molina at the plate. Molina hits a ball which should’ve been a ground rule double, halting Carpenter at third. The umpires missed the ball bouncing out of play, however, and Carpenter was allowed to run home, scoring the winning run. Due to the noise and confusion of the Cardinals’ apparent walkoff win, Reds manager Bryan Price could not hear the phone call from his video coordinator telling him to challenge the play. By the time the message got to Price, he was told his challenge was too late. Game over.

The lack of a replay review in that situation was huge. The call would’ve, without question, been overturned if it were reviewed. If that had occurred, there is a possibility that the Cardinals would’ve lost that game, putting them two games back of the Giants with three to play. Instead, they were gifted a win and are now one game back with three to play. At the very least, this will cause the Giants to have to play one more meaningful game this weekend than they might’ve otherwise had to, in turn giving them one less game to rest players and set up their pitching staff for the Wild Card game. It could also, of course, prove to be the difference between them making the Wild Card game and going home after Sunday’s finale against the Dodgers.

If this comes to pass, Major League Baseball will no doubt characterize Thursday night’s events as a freak occurrence. Just one of those things that you could never predict and thus could never prepare for. If you don’t buy that they’ll admonish you that this outcome would’ve occurred the same way had it happened before replay was instituted in 2014 and, hey, we’re doing the best we can. If you’re still not satisfied, baseball will ignore you and pivot to the fans who care less about it, casting the replay failure as a charming and memorable historical event, a la Merkle’s Boner, the Pine Tar Game or Don Dekinger’s blown call at first base in the 1985 World Series. One which, however bad it seemed at the time, is poised to become just another chapter in baseball’s grand history, ready for highlight reels and preroll ad-sponsored video clips. Baseball will turn the page on this, so why can’t you?

Don’t buy any of that. Not for a second. Don’t buy the notion that this was some sort of freak play because freak plays are, by definition, unforeseeable. And while the narrow specifics of last night’s replay failure in St. Louis may not have been predicted, the weaknesses and vulnerabilities of instant replay as implemented were foreseeable from the moment baseball idiotically decided to use a challenge system to initiate replay reviews.

We sharply criticized the use of a challenge system for instant replay in baseball at the time it was adopted in August 2013. Indeed, we sharply criticized a challenge system almost a year earlier when it was merely suspected that baseball would go in that direction with all of this. The reasons were pretty straightforward. Conceptually speaking, it should not be the responsibility of managers to correct the mistakes or oversights of umpires on the field, which is what a challenge system requires. Moreover, a challenge system, and its rules limiting the number and manner of challenges, subordinates getting the call right to strategy and gamesmanship with respect to when and how to use the arbitrary number of challenges granted, and that makes zero sense when the point is to simply correct mistakes.

The problems with a challenge system were not all conceptual, however. Some were practical. In January 2013, Mike Port, who served as Major League Baseball’s vice president in charge of umpiring between 2005 and 2011, talked about how managers were the weak link in a challenge system, saying “you would be amazed how many managers, coaches, and players are not conversant with the rules.” He might’ve added, as others have, that managers cannot possibly see everything that happens on the field from their vantage point, including balls hit to the boundaries. As a result, the notion that a manager can always instantly and knowledgeably pop out of the dugout to challenge a call is unrealistic. He’s going to need some help.

Which is why every team hired a video coordinator, sitting in the clubhouse watching the plays, ready to call the manager in order to tell him when to challenge and when not to. This arrangement solved one problem — the manager’s inability to see it all — but created others. For one thing, it creates potential inefficiencies and inequalities, with some clubs inevitably having more savvy or highly-skilled coordinators, giving them an edge that fair and impartial umpiring would never have created. For another, it necessitated the use of technology — video and phone lines — and technology can always fail. Just as it did last night when Bryan Price’s phone could not be heard over the roar of the crowd in a pre-playoff frenzy.

It was a technological failure that last night’s crew chief, Bill Miller, implied could’ve been fixed if Price had “made eye contact” or something but, hey, he didn’t, so the game was over. When baseball first announced the challenge system in 2013, John Schuerholz, tasked with defending it, said that it would create “a happy balance that will retain the uniqueness and charm of baseball.” I suppose there’s something “charming” about the need for a major league manager to have to gaze into the eyes of an umpire in order to get a blown call corrected, but one would hope that, in 2016, there are better ways to handle things.

Of course it was obvious that there were better ways to handle it in 2013 when Major League Baseball came up with this dumb system. Baseball’s managers, who did not want a challenge system, knew it. Baseball’s former umpire chief knew it. Even dumb bloggers in their mother’s basement knew it. In 2013, baseball had carte blanche and the support of everyone in the game to institute a system that got calls right. They chose, however, to go with a system that, by definition, does not have getting calls right as its sole objective and by necessity limits the ability for calls to be reviewed in the first place due to managers not being omniscient and omnipresent and due to technological limitations.

For want of a nail the shoe was lost. For want of an answered phone call, a playoff spot might be too. It never had to be this way, but baseball wanted it this way. If the Giants end up sitting at home next week rather than playing the Mets in a Wild Card game, I’m pretty sure they won’t be comforted by whatever baloney Major League Baseball dishes out to tell everyone why this is all OK.