Toronto Blue Jays v Baltimore Orioles

Dylan Bundy making progress after Tommy John surgery


Orioles pitching prospect Dylan Bundy has begun to throw from 45 feet as he continues to make strides on his way back from Tommy John surgery. The right-hander, who was the #2 overall prospect as ranked by Baseball America entering the 2013 season, went under the knife in late June and isn’t expected to be ready to return until June 2014 at the earliest.

During the 2012 season, his first year in professional baseball, the 19-year-old Bundy posted a 2.08 ERA in 103.2 innings between Single-A Delmarva and Frederick as well as Double-A Bowie. He got a cup of coffee in the Majors at the end of September, holding the opposition scoreless on a walk and a hit in 1.2 innings of work.

Over at, Kelsie Heneghan asked Bundy some questions about his rehab, giving some insight as to how the process has gone so far. You talked a little bit about this, but what have you been doing exactly in your rehab and what are the next steps?

Bundy: Shoulder stretches, shoulder [cuff] exercises three times a week and then I’ll do a couple elbows [exercises], usually once a week, but now I’m going to start throwing three times a week. The next step would be basically just advancing my throwing program. [For cuff exercises,] basically you’re working all the rotator cuff muscles: the small muscle groups in the shoulder, the decelerator muscles that help you slow down your arm after you’re finished throwing.

The Orioles could use the rotation help, especially depth-wise, if Bundy is able to return before the second half of the season. As of this writing, their rotation appears to include Chris Tillman, Wei-Yin Chen, Miguel Gonzalez, Bud Norris, and Kevin Gausman.

Dexter Fowler becomes first black player to play for the Cubs in the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Tim Bradbury/Getty Images)
Tim Bradbury/Getty Images

The last time the Cubs were in the World Series was 1945, two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball. As such, until Tuesday night, the Cubs never had a black player play for them in the World Series.

Dexter Fowler changed that, leading off the ballgame at Progressive Field against the Indians. Fowler was made aware of this fact three days ago by Rany Jazayerli of The Ringer:

Fowler, in that at-bat, went ahead in the count 2-1 but ended up striking out looking on a Corey Kluber sinker.

Drew Pomeranz does not need arm surgery

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox throws a pitch in the fifth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Red Sox lefty Drew Pomeranz was of limited utility during the postseason as he began experiencing soreness in his left forearm near the end of the 2016 season. There was some thought that he might need offseason surgery but Pomeranz was examined by doctors who determined that he does not need any surgery, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports. President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said:

He has seen the doctor, the doctor looked at him. I can’t really disclose totally everything that was done, but the doctor said no surgical procedure and the doctor feels he will be ready for next spring training for us.

Pomeranz, 27, finished the 2016 regular season with an aggregate 3.32 ERA and a 186/65 K/BB ratio in 170 2/3 innings between the Padres and Red Sox. He operated out of the bullpen during the playoffs, allowing two runs on four hits and two walks with seven strikeouts over 3 2/3 innings.

The Red Sox acquired Pomeranz in a trade with the Padres in July. It was a trade that earned Padres GM A.J. Preller a 30-day suspension from Major League Baseball, as he reportedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners.