Fun with Free Agent Numbers

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Another free agent domino fell earlier today as outfielder Shin-Soo Choo signed a seven-year, $130 million deal with the Rangers. With Choo gone, Nelson Cruz is the last remaining elite free agent hitter left on the board while Stephen Drew, Matt Garza, and Bronson Arroyo are some of the top remaining players beyond Cruz.

With lots of talent accounted for, let’s have some fun with free agent numbers as of right now, December 21 at 6 PM. All data originally taken from MLB Trade Rumors and played around with in Excel.

Highest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • New York Yankees: $328,000,000 (18%)
  • Seattle Mariners: $261,800,000 (14%)
  • San Francisco Giants: $172,000,000 (9%)

Lowest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • Milwaukee Brewers: $1,950,000 (1%)
  • Atlanta Braves: $4,000,000 (2%)
  • Baltimore Orioles: $4,500,000 (2.5%)

Divisions ranked by spending (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: $463,750,000 (2)
  • AL Central: $290,750,000 (4)
  • AL West: $487,850,000 (1)
  • NL East: $182,475,000 (5)
  • NL Central: $97,900,000 (6)
  • NL West: $305,250,000 (3)

Spending by league:

  • American League: $1,242,350,000 (68%)
  • National League: $585,625,000 (32%)

Most players signed by a team:

  • New York Yankees: 9
  • Chicago White Sox: 6
  • San Francisco Giants: 6
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 6

Fewest players signed by a team:

  • Atlanta Braves: 1
  • Milwaukee Brewers: 1
  • Cleveland Indians: 1
  • Washington Nationals: 1
  • Baltimore Orioles: 1

Divisions ranked by most players signed (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: 23 (1)
  • AL Central: 18 (2)
  • AL West: 16 (4)
  • NL East: 13 (5)
  • NL Central: 11 (6)
  • NL West: 17 (3)

Total players signed by league:

  • American League: 57 (58%)
  • National League: 41 (42%)

Lengthiest deals:

  • Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners: 10 years
  • Jacoby Ellsbury, New York Yankees: 7 years
  • Shin-Soo Choo, Texas Rangers: 7 years

Percentage of multi-year deals by length:

  • 10 years: 1 (1%)
  • 7 years: 2 (2%)
  • 6 years: 1 (1%)
  • 5 years: 2 (2%)
  • 4 years: 6 (6%)
  • 3 years: 9 (9%)
  • 2 years: 28 (29%)
  • 1 year: 49 (50%)

Most multi-year deals given by team:

  • New York Yankees: 5
  • San Francisco Giants: 4
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 3
  • Cincinnati Reds: 3
  • Minnesota Twins: 3

Total amount earned by position on multi-year deals:

  • Starting Pitcher: $333,000,000 (19.5%)
  • Relief Pitcher: $154,625,000 (9%)
  • Catcher: $164,250,000 (9.5%)
  • Infield: $523,300,000 (30.5%)
  • Outfield: $576,200,000 (31.5%)

Multi-year deals earned by position:

  • Starting Pitcher: 9 (18%)
  • Relief Pitcher: 10 (20%)
  • Catcher: 6 (12%)
  • Infield: 13 (26.5%)
  • Outfield: 11 (22.5%)

If you notice any errors or omissions, let me know in the comments and I’ll make the necessary edits.

Jorge Soler diagnosed with strained oblique, Opening Day in doubt

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Royals outfielder Jorge Soler has been diagnosed with a strained oblique, making it likely that he begins the regular season on the disabled list, Rustin Dodd of The Kansas City Star reports.

The Royals acquired Soler from the Cubs in December in exchange for reliever Wade Davis. Over parts of three seasons with the Cubs, Soler hit .258/.328/.434 with 27 home runs and 98 RBI in 765 plate appearances.

When he’s healthy, Soler is expected to find himself in the Royals’ lineup as a right fielder and occasionally as a designated hitter.

Report: Cardinals, Yadier Molina making “major progress” on contract extension

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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the Cardinals and catcher Yadier Molina are making “major progress” on a contract extension. Molina told the team he won’t discuss an extension during the season, hence the rapid progress.

Molina is entering the last guaranteed year of a five-year, $75 million contract signed in March 2012. He and the Cardinals hold a mutual option worth $15 million with a $2 million buyout for the 2018 season. The new extension would presumably cover at least the 2018-19 seasons and likely ’20 as well.

Molina is 34 years old but is still among the most productive catchers in baseball. Last season, he hit .307/.360/.427 with 38 doubles, 58 RBI, and 56 runs scored in 581 plate appearances. Though he has lost a step or two with age, Molina is still well-regarded for his defense. The Cardinals also value his ability to handle the pitching staff.