Fun with Free Agent Numbers

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Another free agent domino fell earlier today as outfielder Shin-Soo Choo signed a seven-year, $130 million deal with the Rangers. With Choo gone, Nelson Cruz is the last remaining elite free agent hitter left on the board while Stephen Drew, Matt Garza, and Bronson Arroyo are some of the top remaining players beyond Cruz.

With lots of talent accounted for, let’s have some fun with free agent numbers as of right now, December 21 at 6 PM. All data originally taken from MLB Trade Rumors and played around with in Excel.

Highest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • New York Yankees: $328,000,000 (18%)
  • Seattle Mariners: $261,800,000 (14%)
  • San Francisco Giants: $172,000,000 (9%)

Lowest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • Milwaukee Brewers: $1,950,000 (1%)
  • Atlanta Braves: $4,000,000 (2%)
  • Baltimore Orioles: $4,500,000 (2.5%)

Divisions ranked by spending (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: $463,750,000 (2)
  • AL Central: $290,750,000 (4)
  • AL West: $487,850,000 (1)
  • NL East: $182,475,000 (5)
  • NL Central: $97,900,000 (6)
  • NL West: $305,250,000 (3)

Spending by league:

  • American League: $1,242,350,000 (68%)
  • National League: $585,625,000 (32%)

Most players signed by a team:

  • New York Yankees: 9
  • Chicago White Sox: 6
  • San Francisco Giants: 6
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 6

Fewest players signed by a team:

  • Atlanta Braves: 1
  • Milwaukee Brewers: 1
  • Cleveland Indians: 1
  • Washington Nationals: 1
  • Baltimore Orioles: 1

Divisions ranked by most players signed (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: 23 (1)
  • AL Central: 18 (2)
  • AL West: 16 (4)
  • NL East: 13 (5)
  • NL Central: 11 (6)
  • NL West: 17 (3)

Total players signed by league:

  • American League: 57 (58%)
  • National League: 41 (42%)

Lengthiest deals:

  • Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners: 10 years
  • Jacoby Ellsbury, New York Yankees: 7 years
  • Shin-Soo Choo, Texas Rangers: 7 years

Percentage of multi-year deals by length:

  • 10 years: 1 (1%)
  • 7 years: 2 (2%)
  • 6 years: 1 (1%)
  • 5 years: 2 (2%)
  • 4 years: 6 (6%)
  • 3 years: 9 (9%)
  • 2 years: 28 (29%)
  • 1 year: 49 (50%)

Most multi-year deals given by team:

  • New York Yankees: 5
  • San Francisco Giants: 4
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 3
  • Cincinnati Reds: 3
  • Minnesota Twins: 3

Total amount earned by position on multi-year deals:

  • Starting Pitcher: $333,000,000 (19.5%)
  • Relief Pitcher: $154,625,000 (9%)
  • Catcher: $164,250,000 (9.5%)
  • Infield: $523,300,000 (30.5%)
  • Outfield: $576,200,000 (31.5%)

Multi-year deals earned by position:

  • Starting Pitcher: 9 (18%)
  • Relief Pitcher: 10 (20%)
  • Catcher: 6 (12%)
  • Infield: 13 (26.5%)
  • Outfield: 11 (22.5%)

If you notice any errors or omissions, let me know in the comments and I’ll make the necessary edits.

Braves sign David Hernandez

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Bill Whitehead of the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports that the Braves have signed reliever David Hernandez to a minor league contract on Sunday. He’ll report to spring training as a non-roster invitee.

Hernandez, who turns 32 years old in May, signed a minor league contract with the Giants in February. He requested and was granted his release on Friday when he learned he wasn’t making the team’s 25-man roster to open the season.

Hernandez pitched for the Phillies last year. He compiled a 3.84 ERA with an 80/32 K/BB ratio in 72 2/3 innings.

Dave Roberts: It “doesn’t make sense” for Scott Kazmir to start year in Dodgers’ rotation

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Scott Kazmir won’t begin the regular season in the Dodgers’ starting rotation. Manager Dave Roberts said after Kazmir’s Cactus League outing on Sunday that it “doesn’t make sense” for the ailing Kazmir to break camp in the rotation, Andy McCullough of the Los Angeles Times reports. The lefty will instead rehab some more and join the rotation at a later time.

Kazmir has been battling a hip issue which has caused his mechanics to suffer. He was clocked in the low 80’s 10 days ago and wasn’t much better on Sunday afternoon.

Last season with the Dodgers, Kazmir posted a 4.56 ERA with a 134/52 K/BB ratio in 136 1/3 innings, his worst numbers since returning to the majors in 2013.