Fun with Free Agent Numbers

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Another free agent domino fell earlier today as outfielder Shin-Soo Choo signed a seven-year, $130 million deal with the Rangers. With Choo gone, Nelson Cruz is the last remaining elite free agent hitter left on the board while Stephen Drew, Matt Garza, and Bronson Arroyo are some of the top remaining players beyond Cruz.

With lots of talent accounted for, let’s have some fun with free agent numbers as of right now, December 21 at 6 PM. All data originally taken from MLB Trade Rumors and played around with in Excel.

Highest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • New York Yankees: $328,000,000 (18%)
  • Seattle Mariners: $261,800,000 (14%)
  • San Francisco Giants: $172,000,000 (9%)

Lowest-Spending Teams (percentage of total spending in parentheses):

  • Milwaukee Brewers: $1,950,000 (1%)
  • Atlanta Braves: $4,000,000 (2%)
  • Baltimore Orioles: $4,500,000 (2.5%)

Divisions ranked by spending (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: $463,750,000 (2)
  • AL Central: $290,750,000 (4)
  • AL West: $487,850,000 (1)
  • NL East: $182,475,000 (5)
  • NL Central: $97,900,000 (6)
  • NL West: $305,250,000 (3)

Spending by league:

  • American League: $1,242,350,000 (68%)
  • National League: $585,625,000 (32%)

Most players signed by a team:

  • New York Yankees: 9
  • Chicago White Sox: 6
  • San Francisco Giants: 6
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 6

Fewest players signed by a team:

  • Atlanta Braves: 1
  • Milwaukee Brewers: 1
  • Cleveland Indians: 1
  • Washington Nationals: 1
  • Baltimore Orioles: 1

Divisions ranked by most players signed (rank among 6 divisions in parentheses):

  • AL East: 23 (1)
  • AL Central: 18 (2)
  • AL West: 16 (4)
  • NL East: 13 (5)
  • NL Central: 11 (6)
  • NL West: 17 (3)

Total players signed by league:

  • American League: 57 (58%)
  • National League: 41 (42%)

Lengthiest deals:

  • Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners: 10 years
  • Jacoby Ellsbury, New York Yankees: 7 years
  • Shin-Soo Choo, Texas Rangers: 7 years

Percentage of multi-year deals by length:

  • 10 years: 1 (1%)
  • 7 years: 2 (2%)
  • 6 years: 1 (1%)
  • 5 years: 2 (2%)
  • 4 years: 6 (6%)
  • 3 years: 9 (9%)
  • 2 years: 28 (29%)
  • 1 year: 49 (50%)

Most multi-year deals given by team:

  • New York Yankees: 5
  • San Francisco Giants: 4
  • Tampa Bay Rays: 3
  • Cincinnati Reds: 3
  • Minnesota Twins: 3

Total amount earned by position on multi-year deals:

  • Starting Pitcher: $333,000,000 (19.5%)
  • Relief Pitcher: $154,625,000 (9%)
  • Catcher: $164,250,000 (9.5%)
  • Infield: $523,300,000 (30.5%)
  • Outfield: $576,200,000 (31.5%)

Multi-year deals earned by position:

  • Starting Pitcher: 9 (18%)
  • Relief Pitcher: 10 (20%)
  • Catcher: 6 (12%)
  • Infield: 13 (26.5%)
  • Outfield: 11 (22.5%)

If you notice any errors or omissions, let me know in the comments and I’ll make the necessary edits.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.