Chris Colabello could be headed to Korea

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Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press reports that the Twins have had discussions with at least one club about sending first baseman/outfielder Chris Colabello to the Korean Baseball Organization.

A move is no sure thing right now, as the Twins’ asking price to let him go is said to be “higher than normal,” potentially upwards of $1 million. Colabello would also have to approve his contract being transferred to a Korean team. Something will have to give soon though, as the Twins will need to clear a 40-man roster spot to make room for the newly-signed Kurt Suzuki.

Colabello, who played seven years in the independent Canadian-American Association, had a strong performance for Team Italy in the World Baseball Classic this spring and hit .194/.287/.344 with seven homers in 55 games during his first taste of the majors this year. He turned 30 in October.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”