Reminder: the public paying for ballparks almost always turns into a hot mess

45 Comments

We’ve mentioned the huge problems that public dollars paying for professional sports stadiums multiple times. In case you’re still agnostic on this point, however, there’s a great story at Bloomberg to help you out. It catalogs the awful results of multiple cities’ public ballpark problems. Cincinnati’s is particularly awesome:

The tax relief hasn’t materialized as pledged, said Todd Portune, a commissioner in Cincinnati’s Hamilton County. Instead, the county government is grappling with annual stadium expenses totaling at least $43 million this year, including debt service, county documents show. Residents have seen a public hospital sold, mass-transit investments postponed and little private development near the stadiums that didn’t involve additional public subsidies, Portune said.

Not that this will stop the next city to claim untold financial and economic benefits as a result of tax dollars funding an arena, stadium or ballpark. And not that it will stop the media from passing along such claims, mostly uncritically.

Cardinals acquire Marcell Ozuna from the Marlins

Getty Images
2 Comments

The St. Louis Cardinals have acquired Marcell Ozuna from the Miami Marlins. Craig Mish of Sirius XM was the first to report that the deal was done. Ozuna still has to take a physical.

There is no report yet about what the Cards had to give up to get Ozuna, but given that the Cards and Marlins put a deal together for Giancarlo Stanton, the sides certainly have discussed various Cards prospects recently.

Ozuna fills a major need for the Cardinals, who had serious weaknesses in the middle of the order in 2017. Last year their number three hitters hit a combined .246/.338/.425 and their cleanup hitters hit 270/.350/.444. Ozuna, 27, had a fantastic offensive year in 2017, hitting .312/.376/.548 with 37 home runs and 124 RBI in 159 games.

Ozuna made $3.5 million this past season and is due for arbitration this offseason. He is under contractual control through 2019.