Robinson Cano, Yankees trade barbs about “disrespect”

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The divorce is over and each of them has found a new love, but Robinson Cano and the Yankees have still decided it’s worth trading barbs about “disrespect” in the past 24 hours.

Here’s Robinson Cano at yesterday’s press conference when asked about his dealings with the Yankees before accepting the Mariners’ $240 million offer:

“I didn’t feel respect. I didn’t get respect from them . . . I was hoping they would come up with a better offer. My goal was to stay there . . . I didn’t see any effort [from the Yankees].”

Know what? I get that. Cano is absolutely wrong for talking publicly about it and doing so gets him absolutely nowhere, but I understand why he may feel that way. The Yankees didn’t even really pretend to be particularly interested. Not saying they should have been — at the price Cano was reportedly demanding it made no sense for New York — but there has developed a certain convention around such high-profile athletes in which everyone at least publicly talks about how badly they want to stay together, etc. and that didn’t happen here. And star athletes are high strung and all of that. So, again, Cano shouldn’t have said this, but I can see where it’s coming from.

Just this morning Yankees President Randy Levine shot back, taking issue with Cano’s claim that the Yankees did not treat him with respect. He said they were more than happy to make a $175 million offer and always treated Cano with respect, but that ultimately it was simply a matter of it not making any kind of sense for the Yankees to commit to a ten-year contract given how those deals have gone for them in the past. He doesn’t blame Cano for taking Seattle’s offer as it was clearly better. Levine added that, rather than disrespect, he thinks Robinson Cano is “very disappointed” he no longer plays for the Yankees.

Now: everyone move on.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.