An arrest is made in the impossibly unseemly theft of the Biogenesis documents


Boca Raton, Florida police announced the arrest of  a tanning salon worker for the theft of the Biogenesis documents Major League Baseball is now using to go after Alex Rodriguez. His name is Reginald St. Fleur. He’s a known associate of Porter Fischer, the former Biogenesis employee who initially obtained the documents and who, at one time anyway, was cooperating with Major League Baseball. St. Fleur is also an associate of Gary Jones, the man who sold the records to MLB.

It all stinks to high heavens of course.

Deadspin’s rundown on it all notes that there are two possibilities, and neither make Major League Baseball look good. Baseball was offering to buy the documents from Fischer, and the two sides were in negotiations to that effect. Either (a) St. Fleur and Jones, who knew about it all, set up Fischer and stole the documents so that they could sell them to MLB; or else (b) Fischer was in cahoots with St. Fleur and Jones and staged the break-in so the documents could be sold to MLB without  Fischer having to be the seller.

Option (b) makes sense given that, in the interim, MLB had sued Fischer and others in an effort to merely subpoena, rather than buy the documents. Option (a) makes sense, however, given that — as Fischer has noted — already had an offer on the table from MLB and faced all kinds of risk in cooking up a theft story.

But what is undeniable here is that Major League Baseball bought documents that were either, by definition, stolen or, at the very least, got to MLB as the result of a criminal conspiracy of some kind. And as the Deadspin article notes, MLB was fully aware of this given that they made an inquiry to the police about the theft prior to purchasing the documents from Jones.

Does that make any of the evidence against Alex Rodriguez false? Of course not. But it makes the provenance of that evidence outrageously shady and supports Alex Rodriguez’s argument that MLB would literally stop at nothing — including inserting itself into some sort of crime — in order to nail him.

Major League Baseball reveals their special event uniforms for 2018


Major League Baseball will once again celebrate various holidays and special occasions with special uniforms this season. The special caps and unis for Memorial Day and the Fourth of July are largely in keeping with past practice. There’s a fairly notable change for Mother’s and Father’s Day, however, as what were once pink and blue accents are now full-blown pink and blue caps.

On Jackie Robinson Day — April 15 — players will, as always, be wearing number 42. New this year will be patches on the jerseys and caps. Like so:

Here is what the Mother’s Day caps will look like:

And for Dad:

Here’s Memorial Day. Like last year, the stars represent the five branches of the U.S. military. There will be camo jerseys, like you’ve seen before, to match:


The Blue Jays’ caps will feature four clusters for the four branches of the Canadian military:

Here’s the Fourth of July which will, again, be paired with stars and stripes-themed jerseys:

And check out the inside of the bill:


Fun fact: the Fourth of July is the day the signing of the Declaration of Independence was signed. It has little if anything to do with the Constitution, from which “We The People” is taken, which was ratified on June 21, 1788. But don’t stop MLB, they’re on a roll.

The Blue Jays cap, again, differs, with the logo being a gold maple leaf and the inside of the bill simply saying “Canada”:

As always, proceeds from the sale of this merch will go to the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Susan G. Komen, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer.

As as also long been the case, Major League Baseball will do nothing for Labor Day, much to my annual annoyance.