An arrest is made in the impossibly unseemly theft of the Biogenesis documents

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Boca Raton, Florida police announced the arrest of  a tanning salon worker for the theft of the Biogenesis documents Major League Baseball is now using to go after Alex Rodriguez. His name is Reginald St. Fleur. He’s a known associate of Porter Fischer, the former Biogenesis employee who initially obtained the documents and who, at one time anyway, was cooperating with Major League Baseball. St. Fleur is also an associate of Gary Jones, the man who sold the records to MLB.

It all stinks to high heavens of course.

Deadspin’s rundown on it all notes that there are two possibilities, and neither make Major League Baseball look good. Baseball was offering to buy the documents from Fischer, and the two sides were in negotiations to that effect. Either (a) St. Fleur and Jones, who knew about it all, set up Fischer and stole the documents so that they could sell them to MLB; or else (b) Fischer was in cahoots with St. Fleur and Jones and staged the break-in so the documents could be sold to MLB without  Fischer having to be the seller.

Option (b) makes sense given that, in the interim, MLB had sued Fischer and others in an effort to merely subpoena, rather than buy the documents. Option (a) makes sense, however, given that — as Fischer has noted — already had an offer on the table from MLB and faced all kinds of risk in cooking up a theft story.

But what is undeniable here is that Major League Baseball bought documents that were either, by definition, stolen or, at the very least, got to MLB as the result of a criminal conspiracy of some kind. And as the Deadspin article notes, MLB was fully aware of this given that they made an inquiry to the police about the theft prior to purchasing the documents from Jones.

Does that make any of the evidence against Alex Rodriguez false? Of course not. But it makes the provenance of that evidence outrageously shady and supports Alex Rodriguez’s argument that MLB would literally stop at nothing — including inserting itself into some sort of crime — in order to nail him.

Dodgers acquire Matt Kemp in five-player trade with Braves

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The Dodgers have pulled off their first blockbuster trade of the offseason, sending Brandon McCarthy, Scott Kazmir, Charlie Culberson, Adrian Gonzalez and cash considerations to the Braves for Matt Kemp, per announcements from both teams. The Braves are set to designate Gonzalez for assignment on Monday, making him a free agent.

Kemp, 33, had a down year with the Braves in 2017, hitting a career-low -0.5 fWAR in 115 games with the club. At the plate, he slashed a modest .276/.318/.463 with 19 home runs and a .781 OPS through 467 plate appearances, but was hampered by a nagging left hamstring strain through most of the season. This will be his 10th campaign with the Dodgers.

Whether or not Kemp can rebound during his second stint in Los Angeles is almost beside the point, however. The deal is effectively a salary dump to end all salary dumps. Offloading multiple one-year contracts for McCarthy, Kazmir and Gonzalez should bring the Dodgers back under the $197 million luxury tax threshold and position them to make a run at some of the big fish in next year’s free agent pool. It’s also worth noting that they may not keep Kemp around for long — per Ken Gurnick of MLB.com, the club appears as likely to flip the veteran outfielder as they are to use him. As for the Braves, they not only rid themselves of the $43 million due Kemp through 2020, but added some rotation and infield depth with McCarthy and Culberson and can now give top prospect Ronald Acuna a legitimate tryout in left field.