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Russell Wilson — yes that one — and 44 players you’ve never heard of taken in Rule 5 draft


The Rule 5 draft took place this morning. It’s traditionally the last thing that happens at the Winter Meetings, so there’s a bittersweet element to it I suppose. We all have to go home today. We all get to go home today. It’s like any vacation story I suppose.

It’s not a terribly interesting event in and of itself, however. It moves quickly. Most “rounds” as it were involve teams passing on a selection. As it is limited to players who (a) have a good amount of minor league service time; but (b) are still not on their club’s 40-man roster, the vast majority of names of available and selected players are anonymous to all but the most hardcore fans and/or prospect watchers.

Of course there are some notable historical exceptions. Johan Santana was a Rule 5 guy once upon a time. As was Josh Hamilton and Shane Victorino and Dan Uggla. But finding good major league regulars in the Rule 5 is pretty rare. And they have to be good enough to be major leaguers at least, because anyone who selects a player in the major league portion of the Rule 5 draft has to keep them on their big league roster — the 25-man roster, not the 40-man — all year or else he is returned to his original club. Of course teams can and often do DL Rule 5 guys with dubious injuries in order to stash them, but that’s another topic altogether.

In any event, 45 guys were selected in the Rule 5 draft this morning. Only nine of those were in the major league portion:

  • The Astros drafted lefty Patrick Schuster from the Diamondbacks;
  • The White Sox drafted catcher Adrian Nieto from the Nationals;
  • The Phillies drafted righty Kevin Munson from the Diamondbacks;
  • The Rockies drafted righty Tommy Kahnle from the Yankees;
  • The Blue Jays drafted lefty Brian Moran from the Phillies;
  • The Brewers drafted lefty Wei-Chung Wang from the Pirates;
  • The Diamondbacks drafted righty Marcos Mateo from the Cubs; and
  • The Orioles drafted third baseman Michael Almanzar from the Red Sox

Beyond that? a lot of minor league selections of no real note. Save one: Russell Wilson. Yes, the Seattle Seahawks QB. He was a second baseman in the Rockies system once upon a time. And though his baseball days are clearly over, the Texas Rangers selected him. Why? According go Ken Rosenthal of Fox, the Rangers want him in-house, in effect, to give motivational speeches and stuff next spring. For real.

Which, when you look at the value of most of the Rule 5 picks, you realize is not all that bad use of these particular resources.

The Cubs acquire Rex Brothers from the Rockies

Rex Brothers Rockies

The number of people who, if you held a gun to their head, would say that “Rex Brothers” was a game show host and/or local TV news personality from the late 1970s or early 80s is not insignificant. But if you’re a Rockies fan or if spend all day thinking about baseball you know that he’s a reliever who has played in Colorado for the past five years. Now you know him as a reliever for the Cubs:

Brothers — a former Best Shape of His Life All-Star — was pretty good until he hit a brick wall in 2014 and spent most of 2015 in Triple-A. He had something of a bounceback after being called up when rosters expanded in September, but that’s not the sort of thing to excite anyone. He could be useful for the Cubs or just spring training cannon fodder and organizational depth.

Cabrera just turned 18 a couple of weeks ago and pitched a grand total of 14 games in the Dominican Summer League. He’s young and was a $250,000 signee from the Dominican as a 16-year-old so, by definition, he’s a project. Worth giving up Rex Brothers for him if you’re the Rockies, worth risking for some depth in the pen if you’re the Cubs.

Diamondbacks hire Dave Magadan as hitting coach

Dave Magadan Rangers
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Steve Gilbert of reports that the Diamondbacks’ new hitting coach is Dave Magadan, who “parted ways” with the Rangers last month after three years filling the same role in Texas.

Magadan also previously was the Red Sox’s hitting coach and his teams have generally done pretty well, including the Rangers scoring the third-most runs in the league this year.

He’ll have plenty of talent to work with in Arizona, as the Diamondbacks scored the second-most runs in the league led by Paul Goldschmidt, A.J. Pollock, and David Peralta. Turner Ward, who had been Arizona’s hitting coach, chose to leave the team two weeks ago.

A’s reacquire Jed Lowrie in trade with Astros

Jed Lowrie

Jed Lowrie, who was traded from the Astros to the A’s in 2013 and then re-signed with the Astros as a free agent last offseason, has now been traded back to the A’s.

Lowrie got a three-year, $23 million deal from the Astros with the idea that he’d play shortstop in the first season and then move to another position whenever stud prospect Carlos Correa arrived. Instead he got hurt right away, Correa became an immediate star, and the Astros weren’t so keen on paying him $15 million over the next two seasons.

He could resume playing shortstop for the A’s, who watched rookie Marcus Semien make an absurd number of errors there this year. Lowrie hit .271 with a .738 OPS in two seasons in Oakland, which is similar to his career totals and makes him a solidly above-average offensive shortstop. There’s a decent chance the A’s will have a Lowrie-Lawrie double-play duo in 2016.

In return the Astros get minor leaguer Brendan McCurry, a 24-year-old right-hander who split 2015 between high Single-A and Double-A with a 1.86 ERA and 82/17 K/BB ratio in 63 relief innings. He was a 22nd-round draft pick in 2014 and doesn’t have exceptional raw stuff, but McCurry’s numbers are incredible so far.

White Sox sign catcher Alex Avila to a one-year deal

Detroit Tigers' Alex Avila, right, is congratulated by third base coach Dave Clark after his solo home run in the third inning in the second game of a baseball doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

There have been a lot of articles published in the past few days about how to navigate awkward Thanksgiving conversations with your relatives. Heck, we even wrote one.

But there’s always room for more! Such as “How to talk to your father at Thanksgiving dinner about the fact that he let you walk away from the only team you’ve ever known to sign with a division rival.” Which is what Alex Avila will likely be talking about with his father, Tigers GM Al Avila:

The older Avila can’t even say he did it because he’s opposed to nepotism. After all, he just hired his other son — who has had his law degree for just over a year — as the Tigers assistant legal counsel for baseball operations. Though I’m sure that wasn’t nepotism. He probably just aced the interview and impressed everyone more than the other candidates did.

OK, those are jokes. In all seriousness, this is a good move for Alex and Al and, probably, the White Sox. With the emergence of James McCann, there really is not space for Alex Avila in Detroit in anything other than a backup capacity. In Chicago, he’ll get more playing time. At least if he can (a) stay healthy; and (b) not hit .191/.339/.287 again like he did in 2015.