Alex Avila AP

Not everyone is happy about home plate collisions being taken away


Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe is not a fan of the new rule banning home plate collisions. Indeed he’s so incensed that he decided to mock the idea of protecting athletes whose health and career are put at risk as a result of them:

One of the game’s biggest stars — Buster Posey — suffered a nearly career-ending knee injury as a result of a collision with then-Marlins outfielder Scott Cousins in May of 2011, therefore we must protect catchers? … Baseball is seeking to ban collisions that have happened since Abner Doubleday invented baseball. What are we doing here? … David Ross and Alex Avila suffered concussions as the result of foul balls off their masks during the 2013 season. Are we banning foul balls soon? … This is sport. This is athleticism. And now we’re taking it away?

Given that Cafardo apparently doesn’t even know the first thing about Posey’s injury — note: it was not his knee — I’m not sure how he’s any sort of expert on this, but that’s tenure for you. He also got the effective date of the rule wrong — it’s 2014 if the union approves it, 2015 if they don’t — but those are just details.

I take greater issue with Cafardo’s fighting straw men and overall faulty logic. No, because Major League Baseball is trying to eliminate injuries from one kind of play it does not mean that all potential hazards must and will be eliminated and no one is suggesting such a thing. No, because catastrophic injuries are rare does not mean they are not serious and in need of some form of address. And the “taking it away” thing. Taking what away? From who? He argues in his column that the rules already do much to limit such collisions and that that should be enough, so he should be happy if all such collisions are gone, right?

In the course of his column Cafardo quotes several managers about home plate collisions and notes that reasonable people can be of two minds about this rule. Too bad that, rather than acknowledge the multiple sides of the matter when he asserted his own opinion, he chose to be cavalier and dismissive about a subject that has very real personal health and career consequences for the players being barreled into at home plate all season.

Wild Card, Division series umpires announced

Angel Hernandez
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Major League Baseball just released the umpire assignments for the Wild Card Game and the Division Series. As always, the basis for these assignments is a proprietary, scientific calculation undertaken by Major League Baseball, mixing in (a) skill; (b) seniority; and (c) trolling of baseball bloggers who, unlike 99% of the rest of the world actually know the names and track records of various umpires and who are easily riled.

Which is to say that, while we have no Joe West in the early playoff rounds this year — too obvious, perhaps? — we do get an Angel Hernandez.

Here are the assignments. The asterisks represent the crew chief of each unit. Guys with little up arrows next to their names are regular season crew chiefs in their own right. Print this out and keep it near your television so you know who to yell about before the broadcasters tell you who to yell at:

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Which teams improved and declined the most in 2015?

Joe Maddon

I was curious about which MLB teams changed their fortunes the most this season compared to last year, so I crunched the numbers.

First, here are the biggest win total improvements from 2014 to 2015:

+24 Cubs
+21 Rangers
+16 Astros
+15 Diamondbacks
+13 Twins
+11 Mets
+10 Blue Jays
+10 Cardinals
+10 Pirates

The top five teams on the biggest-improvement list all had managers in their first season on the job, led by Joe Maddon joining the Cubs after tons of success with the Rays. Also worth noting: Of the nine teams with the biggest win total improvement, eight made the playoffs. Only the Twins improved to double-digit games and still failed to make the playoffs.

Now, here are the biggest win total declines from 2014 to 2015:

-20 Athletics
-16 Tigers
-15 Orioles
-14 Brewers
-13 Nationals
-13 Angels
-12 Braves
-12 Reds
-11 Mariners

Not surprisingly, a whole lot of those teams have changed managers, general managers, or both. And a couple more may still do so before the offseason gets underway. Oakland retained manager Bob Melvin despite an MLB-high 20-win dropoff and just promoted Billy Beane from general manager to vice president of baseball operations.