Multi-sport star Deion Sanders thinks Russell Wilson should “seriously consider baseball”

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Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson is enjoying a nice season. His team is 11-2 and has already clinched at least a Wild Card spot, and will likely soon wrap up the NFC West. What many have forgotten is that he was once a fourth-round pick by the Rockies in the 2010 Major League Baseball draft. He played second base in the Minors for two seasons in A-ball with Tri-City and Asheville, compiling a .710 OPS in 379 plate appearances.

He might have made a useful Major League player someday, but we can all agree he made the right choice to stick with football. Nevertheless, the Rangers plucked Wilson in the Rule-5 draft earlier today. And, according to ESPN’s Richard Durrett, it’s not just a gimmick meant to get publicity. Wilson told GM Jon Daniels he wants to join the Rangers in spring training.Deion Sanders, one of the few multi-sport stars along with Bo Jackson, thinks Wilson “should seriously consider baseball”.

Sanders enjoyed fame as an outfielder over nine seasons with the Yankees, Braves, Reds, and Giants; and as a cornerback with the Falcons, 49ers, Cowboys, Redskins, and Ravens. Few people should be dispensing advice to Wilson, but Sanders certainly can.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.