MLB still trying to get evidence that A-Rod obstructed the Biogenesis investigation

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Alex Rodriguez’s P.R. guy, Michael Sitrick, was allegedly served with a subpoena by Major League Baseball. They wanted him to testify in the arbitration as to whether he or his underlings leaked Biogenesis documents implicating Ryan Braun and Francisco Cervelli to the press. MLB believes that he did, and by doing so A-Rod — through his rep — impeded the Biogenesis investigation, thereby requiring that A-Rod receive a greater suspension than everyone else.

Problem: Sitrick did not appear to testify and the arbitration is now closed. And, as Rich Calder of the New York Post reports, MLB and Sitrick are fighting the matter of his subpoena out in court, with MLB trying to reopen the arbitration to get his testimony in.

Lots of legal things in there that are of interest to some of you, but the bigger take here: if Major League Baseball is frantically trying to get evidence of A-Rod’s obstruction after the arbitration is closed, how strong could their obstruction case as presented in the arbitration actually be? And if it’s not strong, what possible basis is there for a suspension more than four-times greater than that provided by the Joint Drug Agreement?

I’d guess that the evidence that A-Rod did something wrong, thereby justifying a suspension of some sort is pretty good as it compares to all of the other players who got 50-65 game suspensions out of all of this. But the case for over 200 games sounds like the weakest sauce imaginable.

Former Yankees prospect Manny Banuelos signs a minor league deal with the Dodgers

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Remember Manny Banuelos? He was once a top pitching prospect for the Yankees and then, apparently disappeared from the face of the earth. Or at least it felt like it. Now he’s in the news, however, as the Dodgers have signed him to a minor league contract.

OK, Banuelos didn’t disappear. He was traded to the Braves in 2015, had a cup of coffee with them, pitching pretty ineffectively in seven big league games, was released by Atlanta in the middle of 2016 and then latched on with the Angels. This past season he posted a 4.93 ERA over 95 innings while being used mostly as a reliever at Triple-A Salt Lake.

Banuelos pitched in the Future’s Game in 2009 and was a star in the Arizona Fall League in 2010. He was a top-50 prospect heading into 2011 before falling to Tommy John surgery in 2012. With Atlanta he suffered some bone spur problems and then some elbow issues that never resulted in surgery but which never subsided enough for him to fulfill his potential either. He suffered injuries. A lot of pitchers do.

It’s unrealistic to think that Banuelos will fulfill the promise he had six years ago, but he’s worth a minor league deal to see if the 26-year-old can at least be a serviceable reliever.