Managers, GMs to meet today to discuss the abolition of home plate collisions

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At a time when concussions have become the most significant injury on the minds of athletes, coaches, teams and — increasingly — the legal system, baseball will move today to consider abolishing home plate collisions.

As Derrick Goold reported this morning, this past weekend, team trainers and medical officials were told in a presentation here in Florida that 22 percent of all concussions in baseball are caused by collisions, most of which happen at home plate. Major League Baseball will hear from managers and executives today will meet to discuss a ban. Expected to speak, Goold notes, are Cardinals manager Mike Matheny who himself had his career end due to concussions, and Bruce Bochy, also a former catcher, and the manager of Buster Posey, who missed significant time in 2011 after breaking his leg in a home plate collision.

It’s a shame we see so many collisions anyway, as the rules of the game clearly state that a player without a ball is not allowed to block the plate. Likewise, nothing apart from odd tradition provides that a runner who is approaching a base where a fielder waits to tag him with the ball can or should violently prevent it.

While it’s uncertain if a rule change will be adopted, if one is, it will likely specifically provide that the baserunner is to (a) be given an avenue toward the plate and (b) is not allowed to target the catcher physically.

Here’s hoping Matheny and Bochy’s side of things prevails. Baseball is not a contact sport and shouldn’t be allowed to continue to be in this one, odd and dangerous area.

Phillies, Red Sox interested in Carlos Santana

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The Phillies and Red Sox appear intent on pursuing free agent first baseman Carlos Santana, MLB Network’s Jon Morosi reports. Santana rejected a one-year, $17.4 million qualifying offer from the Indians on Thursday and is expected to draw widespread interest on the market this winter. The Mets, Mariners, Angels and Indians could make a play for the infielder, though no serious offers have been made this early in the offseason.

Santana, 31, is coming off of a seven-year track with the Indians. He batted .259/.363/.455 with 23 home runs and 3.0 fWAR last season, making 2017 the fourth-most valuable year of his career to date. Although he was primarily stationed at first base over the last year, he could step back into a hybrid first base/DH role with the Red Sox, who are hurting for infield depth with Hanley Ramirez still working his way back from shoulder surgery.

As for Santana’s other suitors, the Mariners are far less likely to pursue a deal after trading for Ryon Healy last Wednesday. Neither the Mets nor the Phillies have a DH spot to offer the veteran infielder, and the Phillies’ Rhys Hoskins appears to be blocking the way at first base. Then again, Santana may not find a more enticing offer outside of Cleveland, where Edwin Encarnacion might otherwise be the club’s best option at first base. During the GM meetings, Indians’ GM Mike Chernoff said he “love to have both [Santana and Jay Bruce] back” in 2018, but hasn’t backed up that love with any contract talks just yet.