Brad Ausmus makes a good impression

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And no, this is not a continued riff on my managerial handsomeness rankings. I mean, yes, the guy is an absolute dreamboat, but I actually sat through his press availability here at the Winter Meetings a few minutes ago and I cam away impressed for baseball reasons as well.

It’s hard to put a finger on it, but it mostly falls under the category of cliche avoidance. He’s new, so a lot of the questions he was asked were about managerial philosophy and big picture things like, how do you plan to approach bullpen usage and defensive shifts. How do you plan to approach clubhouse things. Stuff like that. A lot of it are subjects that lend themselves to cliches, and boy have I heard a lot of cliches when these topics have come up at the past five Winter Meetings.

But Ausmus pretty steadfastly avoided them. He answered direct questions with direct answers. When he didn’t know the answer or hadn’t thought about the topic yet, he said he didn’t know or hadn’t thought about it yet. But most of his answers suggested a guy who has thought pretty deeply about things and has no problem sharing his thoughts about it.

Maybe he’ll get into the habit of cliche as he’s in the job longer. But I’m optimistic he won’t. Just saying I like the cut of his jib on the first impression.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.