Report: Rockies acquire Brett Anderson from Athletics

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4:32 p.m. EST update: FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal is reporting that the Rockies are acquiring Anderson from the A’s in return for left-hander Drew Pomeranz and right-hander Chris Jensen.

Anderson’s addition will likely leave Juan Nicasio and Jordan Lyles battling for one spot in Colorado’s rotation. The A’s still have six starters without him, a total that doesn’t even include Pomeranz. Jensen, 23, had a 4.55 ERA last season in high-A ball, but that came with a nice 136/39 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings.

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The Denver Post’s Troy Renck and FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal are reporting that the Rockies and A’s have restarted talks regarding left-hander Brett Anderson. The Rockies have also been pursuing Reds reliever Sean Marshall as they attempt to bolster their pitching staff.

As things stand right now, the Rockies are likely looking at a rotation of Jhoulys Chacin, Jorge De La Rosa, Tyler Chatwood, Juan Nicasio and the newly acquired Jordan Lyles, who was picked up in the Dexter Fowler trade with the Astros. The bullpen is set to consist of LaTroy Hawkins, Rex Brothers, Matt Belisle, Adam Ottavino, Chad Bettis, Wilton Lopez and Josh Outman.

Anderson would be an odd choice for a Rockies team that typically works with a pretty strict budget. He’s a big talent, but he’s also an $8 million wild card, which would seem to make him better suited for a large-market team that can afford the risk.

Marshall also comes with some risk after missing most of last year with shoulder problems. He’s one of the game’s premier left-handed reliever when healthy, but he’s also owed $12 million for the next two years. If the Rockies did pick him up, perhaps they’d be more inclined to let Brothers close over Hawkins, since they’d still have another lefty capable of working in the seventh and eighth.

Update: MLB.com’s Thomas Harding reports that Drew Pomeranz’s name has come up in the Anderson talks. Pomeranz, a former top prospect of the Indians, has a 5.20 ERA in 30 starts and four relief appearances for the Rockies over the last three seasons.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.