Tony La Russa Bobby Cox, Joe Torre all unanimously elected to the Hall of Fame

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LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL — For the first time in a long time we have living, breathing inductees for the Hall of Fame. The Veteran’s Committee has elected Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa and Joe Torre. They will be inducted next summer in Cooperstown.

La Russa – unanimously elected by the sixteen member Veteran’s Committee — ranks third all-time in wins among managers, having compiled a 2,728-2,365 record in 33 seasons. He won three World Series: in 1989 with the Oakland Athletics and 2006 and 2011 with the St. Louis Cardinals. He won six pennants overall, three each with Oakland and St. Louis and spent eight years managing the Chicago White Sox as well.

Cox — also voted in unanimously — is right on La Russa’s historic heels, ranking fourth all-time in wins among managers, compiling a 2,504-2,001 record in 29 seasons with the Braves and Blue Jays. A World Series winner in 1995, he won five National League pennants in 25 years with the Braves and won a lot of games in four years as Toronto’s manager.  His signature accomplishment, however, is one of year-in-year-out excellence, leading the Braves to 14 division titles between 1991 and 2005.

Joe Torre was also unanimously elected. His Hall of Fame resume comes from both his playing and his managing exploits. The National League MVP in 1971, Torre was one of the more underrated players from the sixties and seventies. Of course he wouldn’t be entering Cooperstown if it weren’t for his years as a manager, in which he won four World Series titles and six pennants — all with the Yankees — in 29 seasons. Overall he was 2,326-1,997 record managing the Mets, Braves, Cardinals, Yankees and Dodgers.

Left on the outside looking in: Dave Concepcion, Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Billy Martin, Marvin Miller, Dave Parker, Dan Quisenberry, Ted Simmons and George Steinbrenner, none of whom mustered more than six of the twelve votes required for induction.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.