Rakuten Golden Eagles may not post Masahiro Tanaka due to $20 million posting fee limit

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Major League Baseball and Nippon Professional Baseball recently agreed to a new posting system, altering the way Major League teams pursue Japanese talent. One of the changes capped posting fees at $20 million, meaning that if multiple teams are willing to pay the fee, the player can negotiate with them all, with only the winner being stuck with actually paying the $20 million.

The effect of the new system has been immediately felt as the Rakuten Golden Eagles, who currently control pitcher Masahiro Tanaka, are now much more hesitant to post their star player, per Patrick Newman on Twitter. Newman also translated a Japanese article on the situation in which a Rakuten executive is quoted as saying, “asking [Tanaka] to stick around will be the priority.”

In the event Tanaka is posted, he would become the most sought-after starting pitcher among those still available, jumping ahead of Bartolo Colon, Matt Garza, Bronson Arroyo, Ervin Santana, A.J. Burnett, and Ubaldo Jimenez.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.