Brett Gardner is drawing “significant” trade interest

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With last night’s signing of Carlos Beltran, the Yankees officially have a surplus of outfielders. And more than a few teams are wondering if they would consider cashing in on that depth in order to upgrade in other areas.

David Waldstein of the New York Times hears the same. Many have speculated that Gardner could potentially be moved as part of a deal for Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips, though it’s unclear whether there’s legitimate interest from either side. Still, ESPN’s Buster Olney believes that the Yankees are more likely to trade for infield help than pay a high price in the free agent market, possibly for someone like Omar Infante.

On a related note, Reds general manager Walt Jocketty told Mark Sheldon of MLB.com at RedsFest today that a Phillips-to-New York rumor earlier this offseason was leaked by the Yankees as part of a negotiating tactic with Robinson Cano. It could be a little awkward to have those conversations again now, but if their needs match up, why not? WFAN’s Sweeny Murti thinks that a Gardner-for-Homer Bailey deal could make more sense.

Gardner, 30, batted .273/.344/.416 with 51 extra base hits (including a career-high eight homers), 52 RBI and 24 stolen bases this past season and is slated to hit free agency next winter.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.