Red Sox, Brewers among teams to indicate interest in Logan Morrison

12 Comments

The Marlins signed Garrett Jones to a two-year, $7.5 million deal this afternoon, effectively squeezing Logan Morrison out. Instantly, rumors began to fly involving Morrison in a potential trade. Jon Morosi of FOX Sports tweets that the Red Sox and Brewers have checked in, though nothing is imminent.

Morrison has had trouble staying on the field over the past two seasons thanks to a patellar tendon injury in his right knee. After posting an aggregate 119 adjusted OPS in 2010-11 in 812 plate appearances, he declined to a 92 adjusted OPS in 2012-13 in 667 trips to the dish. He has also posted a negative WAR in each of the past three seasons, according to Baseball Reference.

The Brewers are looking for an everyday first baseman, having shown interest in Ike Davis of the Mets. Morrison would be an acceptable alternative. The Red Sox, meanwhile, were prepared to take a more serious look at Morrison if Mike Napoli decided to take his services elsewhere. He wound up agreeing to a deal with the Sox.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.