UPDATE: Mariners planning to offer nine years, $225 million to Robinson Cano

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UPDATE: The Mariners may not have offered $200 million to Robinson Cano yet, but it sounds like it’s going to happen before long.

David Waldstein of the New York Times and CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman are both reporting that the Mariners plan to offer nine years and $225 million to Cano. This is a slightly different number than what was reported by Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes earlier this afternoon, but it’s still likely higher than where the Yankees are willing to go.

Nine years and $225 million would give Cano an AAV (average annual value) of $25 million, tying him with Ryan Howard, Josh Hamilton, and Felix Hernandez for the fifth-highest in MLB history.

6:36 p.m. ET: Don’t rule out Robinson Cano’s return to the Yankees just yet.

Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes made some waves earlier this afternoon when he reported that Robinson Cano was on a plane to Seattle and that the Mariners were willing to bid $230-240 million over 10 years in order to sign him. However, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal hears that no such offer has been made. At least not yet.

In other words, Cano is aiming to land the same contract that Albert Pujols received from the Angels (10 years, $240 million) two offseasons ago. Only two deals in MLB history have been richer, both of them for Alex Rodriguez, first with the Rangers in December of 2000 ($252 million) and later with the Yankees in December of 2007 ($275 million). The Mariners are obviously interested in making a big splash this winter, but they’ll likely have to blow the Yankees out of the water to have a chance. $240 million would probably do just that, but we’re not sure it’s actually on the table.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.