UPDATE: Mariners planning to offer nine years, $225 million to Robinson Cano

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UPDATE: The Mariners may not have offered $200 million to Robinson Cano yet, but it sounds like it’s going to happen before long.

David Waldstein of the New York Times and CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman are both reporting that the Mariners plan to offer nine years and $225 million to Cano. This is a slightly different number than what was reported by Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes earlier this afternoon, but it’s still likely higher than where the Yankees are willing to go.

Nine years and $225 million would give Cano an AAV (average annual value) of $25 million, tying him with Ryan Howard, Josh Hamilton, and Felix Hernandez for the fifth-highest in MLB history.

6:36 p.m. ET: Don’t rule out Robinson Cano’s return to the Yankees just yet.

Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes made some waves earlier this afternoon when he reported that Robinson Cano was on a plane to Seattle and that the Mariners were willing to bid $230-240 million over 10 years in order to sign him. However, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal hears that no such offer has been made. At least not yet.

In other words, Cano is aiming to land the same contract that Albert Pujols received from the Angels (10 years, $240 million) two offseasons ago. Only two deals in MLB history have been richer, both of them for Alex Rodriguez, first with the Rangers in December of 2000 ($252 million) and later with the Yankees in December of 2007 ($275 million). The Mariners are obviously interested in making a big splash this winter, but they’ll likely have to blow the Yankees out of the water to have a chance. $240 million would probably do just that, but we’re not sure it’s actually on the table.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.