“This meant Ted Williams’s head was now ready to be cut off”

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We’ve all heard about what happened to Ted Williams after he died. His son John-Henry Williams had his body transferred to the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Arizona where they froze his body in the hopes that, one day, medical science could reanimate The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.

There has been controversy and litigation about all of that over the past decade. Now come some details in the form of a new biography of Williams entitled The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams,” by Ben Bradlee Jr., to be published tomorrow by Little, Brown and Co. Today the Boston Globe has an adapted excerpt from it. Specifically, the part about what happened to The Kid’s body in the hours after his death.

It also has some background on how Williams’ body found its way to Alcor. Specifically, on John-Henry Williams’ fascination with cryogenics cryonics. A fascination so great that it may very well have trumped his father’s specific wishes about what he wanted to have done with his remains after he died.

You can read this as an interesting set of anecdotes about Ted Williams. You can also read this as a somewhat unsettling glimpse at what waits in store for many people who approach death and depend on their families to take care of their final wishes.

But either way: it’s the best thing you’ll hear about a former .400 hitter being decapitated all day. I guarantee you that.

Erasmo Ramirez to be shut down with a minor lat strain

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Mariners right-hander Erasmo Ramirez has been shut down for two weeks with a minor lat strain, reports Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times. It’s a precautionary move, as Ramirez felt some tightness in his arm and could not complete his scheduled bullpen session on Saturday.

There’s no word yet on whether Ramirez will be able to recover in time for the start of the season, though he’s expected to claim a rotation spot again this spring. The 28-year-old righty has been dogged by injuries throughout his six-year career, but finally managed to piece together a full season on the mound in back-to-back stints with the Rays and Mariners in 2017. He went 5-6 in 19 starts for the two clubs and turned in a cumulative 4.39 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 7.5 SO/9 through 131 1/3 innings.

The Mariners are no stranger to pitcher injuries, either. They lost a number of their top arms to various elbow, arm and shoulder injuries last year and cycled through 40 total pitchers as they limped toward a 78-84 finish. Comments from club manager Scott Servais indicate that the team will keep a close eye on Ramirez throughout his recovery, though Divish notes that right-hander Andrew Moore and lefty Ariel Miranda could also slot into the no. 5 spot if Ramirez experiences further setbacks.