Giants “moving toward” deal with Ryan Vogelsong

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San Francisco continues to work on solidifying its rotation even after re-signing Tim Lincecum and adding Tim Hudson, with Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle reporting that the Giants are “working toward” a deal to bring back right-hander Ryan Vogelsong.

Vogelsong became a free agent after the Giants declined his $6.5 million option for 2014 following a rough year in which he posted a 5.73 ERA in 19 starts at age 35. His strikeout rate took a nosedive, his average fastball velocity fell below 90 miles per hour, and Vogelsong’s secondary numbers weren’t a whole lot more promising than his ugly ERA.

Still, as a potential fifth starter in a rotation led by Madison Bumgarner, Matt Cain, Hudson, and Lincecum he’d be a reasonable enough re-sign on a modest one-year contract.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.