Japanese baseball officials will try to resolve posting issue in New York

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Jon Heyman of CBS Sports is reporting that top Japanese baseball officials will attempt to finalize a new posting system in New York this week, which will impact free agent pitcher Masahiro Tanaka, the most sought-after prize from the Nippon Professional Baseball league.

More, from Heyman:

There is renewed hope for a posting agreement after deals fell though in late October and again about 10 days ago, though there is no guarantee a deal will be struck. Representatives from the 12 teams of the Nippon Baseball League reportedly re-started their own meetings last Monday, according to the Japan Times.

It was also reported that the Japanese officials were moving back toward a deal similar to the previous one whereby interested teams place blind bids. The team with the highest bid is then awarded an exclusive negotiating window with the player.

It is suggested that a winning posting bid could reach as high as $75 million, which would exceed the $51.7 million posted by the Rangers for Yu Darvish prior to the 2012 season.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.