Tim Hudson writes letter to say thanks to the Braves and Atlanta

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Here’s a really nice gesture from veteran right-hander Tim Hudson, who left the Braves earlier this week when he agreed to a two-year, $23 million contract with the Giants.

Hudson decided to submit a letter to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in order to say thanks to the Braves and the fans for making him and his family feel welcome during his nine seasons in Atlanta. The entire letter is not free — you’ll find it behind a paywall — but feel free to read a couple of paragraphs below.

“When I was traded from the Oakland A’s to the Atlanta Braves before the 2005 season, a childhood dream was realized.  I grew up a Braves fan just a few hours south of Atlanta, and it was hard for me to believe that I was going to actually play for the Atlanta Braves and legendary manager Bobby Cox.  My family was young.  We had a toddler (Kennedie), a baby (Tess), and a baby on the way (Kade).  We were welcomed into the Braves organization with open arms.  Our son was born two weeks into my first season, and our journey began.  The Atlanta Braves are really all that our children know about this crazy baseball life, and we are so thankful for this upbringing for them.”

“And to the city of Atlanta and the amazing fans in all of Braves country…my deepest thanks.  Braves fans are one-of-a-kind.  Your passion to win comes close to equaling that of the players that go out on the field each and every game.  But when the team goes through rough patches, you’re there to encourage and cheer and believe that things will turn around.  In my 9 seasons, we definitely had some very high moments and some extremely disappointing moments.  But one thing that I learned is this – once a Braves fan, always a Braves fan. No matter what.  And as a player, that means more than you could understand.”

Classy stuff. Hudson has strong ties to Georgia and Alabama, so he’ll surely continue to have a presence in the area.

Hudson went 113-72 with a 3.56 ERA during his time with the Braves. He made one All-Star appearance in 2010.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.