Jeremy Barfield is making the transition from position player to pitcher

5 Comments

Interesting story from Jane Lee of MLB.com about the Athletics’ Jeremy Barfield, who is busy making the transition from position player to pitcher.

Jeremy, the son of former major league outfielder Jesse Barfield, was informed about his move to the mound back in July. An eighth-round pick of Oakland in 2008, the 25-year-old posted a .261/.329/.399 batting line over parts of six seasons in the minors and didn’t appear likely to reach the majors as a position player. The A’s have always been intrigued by his arm strength from the left side, so they are hoping he can follow a similar path as Sean Doolittle, who has made the switch from oft-injured first base prospect to one of the most dominant relievers in the American League.

Barfield started out in the instructional league and recently spent some time in the Dominican Republic for winter ball. A’s director of player development Keith Lieppman understandably still considers him “raw” at this point in his development, but he’s topping out at 93 mph with his fastball and also throws a slider and split-finger.

Interestingly, Barfield learned his slider in part due to former All-Star Dontrelle Willis, whom he met while doing his other job of hanging up Christmas lights on houses in Arizona. Most of those houses are owned by major league players. Barfield uses his second job as a motivational tool.

“All those houses make me want to work harder,” Barfield said, “just so I can live there. All I want is a chance.”

Really cool story. Barfield is very active on Twitter, so be sure to follow his journey there.

The Baltimore Orioles did not try to get Shohei Ohtani . . . out of principle

Getty Images
10 Comments

Shohei Ohtani made it pretty clear early in the posting process that he was not going to consider east coast teams. As such, it’s understandable if east coast teams didn’t stop all work in order to put together an Ohtani pitch before he signed with the Angels. The Baltimore Orioles, however, didn’t do so for a somewhat different reason than all of the other also-rans.

Their reason, as explained by general manager Dan Duquette on MLB Network Radio yesterday was “because philosophically we don’t participate on the posting part of it.” Suggesting that, as a matter of policy, they will not even attempt to sign Japanese players via the posting system.

Like I said, that probably didn’t make a hill of beans’ difference when it came to Ohtani, who was unlikely to give the O’s the time of day. I find it really weird, though, that the Orioles would totally reject the idea of signing Japanese players via the posting system on policy grounds. None of their opponents are willing to unilaterally disarm in that fashion, I presume.

More than that, though, why would you make that philosophy public? Don’t you want your rivals to think you’re in competition with them in all facets of the game? Don’t you want your fans to think that you’ll stop at nothing to improve the team?

An odd thing to say for Duquette. I don’t know quite why he’d say such a thing.