Mariano Rivera to Drew Storen: “You don’t need my cutter”

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Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post put together an in-depth look at Drew Storen’s late-season turnaround. It’s a great read, chock full of charts and stats, but perhaps the most interesting part came in the opening paragraph.

Drew Storen had the privilege of meeting Mariano Rivera. Knowing such an opportunity is fleeting, Storen asked Rivera if he could impart wisdom on throwing the cut fastball, the pitch that Rivera lived on for 17 years as the game’s best closer. Rivera sagely replied, “You don’t need my cutter.”

More, via Kilgore:

“Right away, he goes, ‘You don’t need it,’ ” Storen said over the phone Thursday morning, as he drove to a workout in his hometown Indianapolis. “ ‘You got 43 saves at the big league level. You don’t need my cutter.’ I’m like, ‘Oh, okay.’ He goes, ‘You got everything you need. If you make the most of what makes you successful, then you’ll be successful.’ ”

Storen posted a 5.95 ERA through the end of July, prompting a two-week demotion to Triple-A Syracuse. Kilgore writes that, while in Syracuse, Storen changed his delivery to include a quick leg kick, and he changed his arm slot. While his results in Triple-A were not any better, the Nationals called him back up in mid-August. From August 16 through the end of the season, Storen posted a 1.40 ERA. The most staggering change was that he did not allow a home run in 19.1 innings compared to allowing seven in 42.1 innings prior to his demotion.

It is a small sample size with which to work, but the evidence seems to point to Storen having changed for the better. Still, it’d be nice to get the recipe to Rivera’s cutter. It couldn’t hurt.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.