There will be no opportunity for public comment before the Braves ballpark vote

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The Cobb County Commission’s vote on the Braves ballpark is a forgone conclusion. It’s going to pass. No one I’ve read or heard who knows what goes on down there thinks any different. But forgone conclusion or not, it strikes me as a jerk move to not allow public comment on the matter prior to the vote. But that’s what’s going down.

Tim Lee, Chairman of the Commission, was asked about why there wouldn’t be a public hearing before the vote:

“We’ve made a decision we’re not going to do that. I don’t know that having a public hearing would add to the objective of getting more input since we’ve got a lot of input to date.”

Yeah, this thing has been a matter of public discourse for ages! Or, well, a bit over a week, but either way. But really, who needs to look more closely at a public project that was kept secret from all but a few land speculators until the last moment? There is clearly nothing that could be gained from any scrutiny of that. Don’t worry your pretty little heads about it.

Forgone conclusion or not, it just seems to me that if you’re going to do something with public funds like this, and you’re going to do it in such a way that consciously avoids any public referendum on the matter, voters should at least have you on the record defending your rationale for when they do get a chance to pass judgment later. Specifically, in the course of your reelection bid. But no. Now we get “there’s no point in talking about it.” Later, I presume, we’ll get “there’s no sense in revisiting the past.”

Thought experiment: instead of $300 million + to the Braves’ benefit, the Commission decides to give $300 million to the poor. I wonder how them not holding any public debate on the matter would go over then?

Scooter Gennett wins arbitration case against Reds

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The Reds lost their first arbitration case of the offseason, per a report from Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports. Second baseman Scooter Gennett was awarded the $5.7 million salary figure he was seeking from the team, a $600,000 bump over the $5.1 million they countered with last month.

Gennett, 27, is coming off of a career-best performance in 2017. After getting claimed off of waivers by the Reds last March, he broke out with an impressive .295/.342/.531 batting line, 27 home runs and 2.4 fWAR in 497 plate appearances. By season’s end, he ranked among the top five most productive second basemen in the National League (and 12th overall). He’s currently set to remain under team control through 2019.

Gennett was only the second Reds player to go to an arbitration hearing this winter. Fellow infielder Eugenio Suarez was defeated in arbitration last week and stands to make just $3.75 million compared to the $4.2 million he filed for in January. All 22 arbitration cases have now been resolved. Twelve were decided in favor of the players.