A-Rod: Bud Selig is trying to destroy me

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A-Rod bolted today’s hearing, and headed straight to Mike Francessa’s show on WFAN.

They’re talking as if it was a spontaneous eruption, but it’s almost as if it was planned that way.

Rodriguez and his lawyer, Joe Tacopina, were on the show (link here). It’ll likely be archived there later. For what it’s worth, A-Rod is fired up: “I’m so pissed off right now I can’t even think straight.” He is ripping into Bud Selig. He said Selig is “trying to destroy me. To put me on his big mantle on the way out, that’s a hell of a trophy.”

Other choice soundbites:

  • “I know [Selig doesn’t] like New York, but you gotta come face me.”
  • “And [Selig] doesn’t have the courage to come and tell me this is why I’m gonna destroy your career?”
  • “People have told me ‘I hate your guts, but what MLB is doing to you is disgusting.’ ”

Rodriguez said he was planning on testifying on Friday, but now that Bud Selig is not testifying, he is unwilling to go back.

A-Rod and Tacopina’s position: Major League Baseball has not carried its burden of proof. Indeed, Tacopina said that the league hasn’t put on a shred of evidence to justify a suspension and that if MLB came to him today with an offer of a 50-game suspension, A-Rod would turn it down. “He shouldn’t serve an inning.” he said.

Whether A-Rod is there or not, the panel will eventually make a decision. And it if it’s not to his liking, A-Rod’s appeal rights are severely limited, as courts tend not to review employment arbitration decisions. So there is no escaping the fact that by turning up the heat like he has, A-Rod is playing a dangerous game.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.