Gabe Kapler on joking/hazing/bullying in baseball

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We talked a bit last week about hazing and bullying in Major League Baseball. Mostly we talked about how people don’t talk about it much.  One of the reasons people don’t talk about it much is because there are not any clear lines between pranks, hazing, bullying and any number of other things that can be either malignant or benign, depending on the spirit and motivation for the incident and how it is received by its target.

Into that wades Gabe Kapler, who has plenty of first hand experience with all of that. He has a thoughtful column up over at Fox Sports.com today in which the gray area of all of that is explored, along with some fun and illuminating anecdotes.  One takeaway is pretty key:

Although I vowed to myself that I would never be the ringleader of any similar incident, I began to authentically connect with the idea that through ribbing, hazing and light illumination of faults, coming of age can occur.

In some cases, this can even speed up player development as toughness off the field can spill over into plate appearances. No way to quantify, of course, but I can attest to feeling more confident after understanding banter and thereby feeling more connected to my teammates; the chest puffed out slightly further is always beneficial on the field. The confidence is derived through fitting in societally, being accepted. I’ve finally fulfilled my rite of passage; now I belong. Now I can go play and know my teammates are beneath me, partially supporting my weight.

That’s key because it makes a good argument for the sort of bonding rituals that, in some instances, can be taken as hazing or even bullying but which are useful if everyone involved understands what’s going on.

It’s also key because Kapler’s particular story involves being messed with after some youthful and regrettable self-promotion on his part.  His experience goes a long way towards explaining why baseball’s culture is what it is and why you don’t see many self-promoters in the game. Or, when you do, why they are so often singled out as “problems.”

Anyway: good read. With some thoughts to keep in mind as the larger conversation about bullying and hazing works its way toward Major League Baseball, as it inevitably will.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.