Clint Hurdle, Terry Francona named Managers of the Year

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The Manager of the Year awards, annually given to the guys whose teams exceed expectations by the greatest amount, was claimed Tuesday by Pirates skipper Clint Hurdle in the NL and the Indians’ Terry Francona in the AL.

Hurdle was the easy winner in the Senior Circuit, receiving 25 of the 30 first-place votes. He was listed second on the other five ballots. Dodgers manager Don Mattingly was second, getting two first-place votes and 17 second-place votes. Braves manager Fredi Gonzalez was first on three ballots, but he was second on just four, so he finished well behind Mattingly in third place.

The Cardinals’ Mike Matheny was the only other NL manager to receive votes. He was second on four ballots and third on seven.

The AL vote was much closer, with Francona receiving 16 first-place votes to Red Sox manager John Farrell’s 12. A’s skipper Bob Melvin got the remaining two and finished in third place. Overall, Francona finished with 112 points to Farrell’s 96. Both were left off two ballots.

In all, nine AL managers received votes, with Joe Girardi finishing fourth, Joe Maddon fifth and Jim Leyland sixth. Buck Showalter, Ron Washington and Ned Yost each received a single third-place vote.

They were the first Manager of the Year awards for both Hurdle and Francona, who met in the World Series while guiding different teams in 2007. Hurdle had his high finish with the Rockies that year, ending up third in the NL balloting. Francona had never finished higher than fourth in the balloting despite his 744-552 record in eight years with the Red Sox. Of course, expectations were higher then.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.