Jose Offerman nowhere to be found as lawsuit for 2007 attack looms

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You may remember when former major league infielder Jose Offerman attacked two players with a bat while he was a member of the independent Long Island Ducks back in 2007. He may now have to pay for it. If someone can track him down, that is.

John Nathans, one of the players involved in the attack, suffered a head injury which ended his baseball career and sued Offerman and the Ducks for $4.8 million in 2009. The matter is pending in federal court in Connecticut, but the Associated Press reports that Offerman is nowhere to be found:

As a federal lawsuit over the attack heads to trial, the attorney for the journeyman catcher whose career was ended with a swing of Offerman’s bat doesn’t know where the two-time All-Star is – and doesn’t expect him to show up for court.

J. Craig Smith, the attorney for former Bridgeport Bluefins catcher John Nathans, tried to serve Offerman with discovery documents in recent months, with no success.

“It’s been so difficult for me to track him down,” Smith said. “I certainly don’t expect Offerman to show up at court.”

Offerman was charged with felony assault after the attack, but it was dismissed after he was granted a probation program and ordered to take anger management classes. They apparently didn’t do him any good, as he was banned from the Dominican Winter League for life after throwing a punch at an umpire while serving as the manager of the Licey Tigers in 2010. While there’s record of him living in the New York City area, he has flown under the radar ever since.

The trial, scheduled for January, could still go on even if Offerman doesn’t show up to defend himself and he could be held liable for Smith’s injuries. The Ducks have denied any wrongdoing.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.