Rosenthal: Ervin Santana wants more than $100 million

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It’s still early November, so there’s no harm in aiming high. According to FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal, free agents Ervin Santana and Ricky Nolasco are doing just that. Santana wants “more than $100 million” for five years, while Nolasco would settle for a mere $80 million over the same timeframe.

Santana’s asking price would seem to be the more realistic of the two. He has been up and down in his career, but he’s had three seasons of at least 210 innings pitched and ERAs under 3.50. Nolasco’s career-best ERA is 3.52, his career mark is 4.37 and he’s spent his entire career working in the easier league. Certainly, no AL team is going to fork over $14 million-$16 million per year in the hopes that Nolasco can make the transition, whereas Santana would fit just about anywhere.

Considering that Nolasco was a below average starter four straight years prior to his nice 2013, he’d going to be very risky on anything longer than a two-year deal. He’ll get three years and maybe even four from some team, but it’s hard to imagine anyone giving him five.

Santana, on the other hand, likely will approach $100 million for five years. $90 million, anyway, seems realistic. Because he has fewer durability questions than Matt Garza, many seem to view him as the top starter in free agency (with Japanese non-free agent Masahiro Tanaka on another level entirely).

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.