A-Rod’s lawyers want the feds to investigate Major League Baseball

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Another day without actual arbitration proceedings, another day with lawyers in the A-Rod case finding a camera and going off. This from Lanny Davis, lawyer to A-Rod and former lawyer to Bill Clinton. So he knows from media attention:

“I repeat my request that U.S. authorities should initiate an investigation as to whether any federal crimes have been committed by MLB investigators as well as those in the Commissioner’s office who may have been complicit in this misconduct — for example, in the purchase of stolen documents; or whether MLB filed information with the IRS that federal law requires for this type of a commercial transaction involving $125,000 in cash.”

That’d be the $125,000 paid for documents — or whatever it paid for — from Biogenesis. That were stolen, by the way, but never you mind.

Indeed, it’s hard to look at everything Major League Baseball has done — or, at the very least, is accused of doing — in the course of the A-Rod investigation and not believe that it’s, at best, acted a bit shady. I mean, buying stolen documents for $125,000 is not exactly your typical employment discipline scenario.

That said: fat chance of anything coming of this.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.