A-Rod’s lawyers file a complaint with the arbitrator over a leak to the New York Times

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The New York Times story we linked this morning reported that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for a stimulant in 2006. That information is not supposed to be released to anyone and, as such, A-Rod’s attorneys have filed a complaint with the arbitrator in the pending appeal of his 211-game suspension objecting to the disclosure.

For its part, Major League Baseball denies that it leaked it. This comment in the New York Daily News makes little sense, however:

It would seem unlikely that MLB would leak that information, according to a source familiar with the alleged positive test.

“All it would do,” said the source, “is make it look to the arbitrator like baseball is desperate to out Rodriguez. Why would they do that?”

How about: because baseball has fought the P.R. war just as hard as A-Rod has, and part of that P.R. war is in painting A-Rod as a long-term scofflaw of Major League Baseball’s drug rules? Indeed, just three freaking days ago, Rob Manfred said this:

“Mr. Rodriguez’s use of PEDs was longer and more pervasive than any other player . . . ”

If that’s your case — and it clearly is part of MLB’s case — why wouldn’t you leak stuff about A-Rod’s drug use being long and pervasive? It’s in complete lockstep with your theory. A theory which you have been trying to get out to the public for quite a while now.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.