A-Rod’s lawyers file a complaint with the arbitrator over a leak to the New York Times

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The New York Times story we linked this morning reported that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for a stimulant in 2006. That information is not supposed to be released to anyone and, as such, A-Rod’s attorneys have filed a complaint with the arbitrator in the pending appeal of his 211-game suspension objecting to the disclosure.

For its part, Major League Baseball denies that it leaked it. This comment in the New York Daily News makes little sense, however:

It would seem unlikely that MLB would leak that information, according to a source familiar with the alleged positive test.

“All it would do,” said the source, “is make it look to the arbitrator like baseball is desperate to out Rodriguez. Why would they do that?”

How about: because baseball has fought the P.R. war just as hard as A-Rod has, and part of that P.R. war is in painting A-Rod as a long-term scofflaw of Major League Baseball’s drug rules? Indeed, just three freaking days ago, Rob Manfred said this:

“Mr. Rodriguez’s use of PEDs was longer and more pervasive than any other player . . . ”

If that’s your case — and it clearly is part of MLB’s case — why wouldn’t you leak stuff about A-Rod’s drug use being long and pervasive? It’s in complete lockstep with your theory. A theory which you have been trying to get out to the public for quite a while now.

Scooter Gennett wins arbitration case against Reds

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The Reds lost their first arbitration case of the offseason, per a report from Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports. Second baseman Scooter Gennett was awarded the $5.7 million salary figure he was seeking from the team, a $600,000 bump over the $5.1 million they countered with last month.

Gennett, 27, is coming off of a career-best performance in 2017. After getting claimed off of waivers by the Reds last March, he broke out with an impressive .295/.342/.531 batting line, 27 home runs and 2.4 fWAR in 497 plate appearances. By season’s end, he ranked among the top five most productive second basemen in the National League (and 12th overall). He’s currently set to remain under team control through 2019.

Gennett was only the second Reds player to go to an arbitration hearing this winter. Fellow infielder Eugenio Suarez was defeated in arbitration last week and stands to make just $3.75 million compared to the $4.2 million he filed for in January. All 22 arbitration cases have now been resolved. Twelve were decided in favor of the players.