Kolten Wong: “My foot slipped”


The last thing a forlorn Kolten Wong wanted to do after getting picked off to end St. Louis’ Game 4 loss on Sunday was talk to reporters in front of his locker, but he stood up to the mics and answered questions anyway.

Wong, a rookie second baseman who pinch-ran for the hobbled Allen Craig, added that he had no intention of trying to steal with Carlos Beltran up in a two-run game; he was just trying to get his lead for the pitch and hopefully go first to third or first to home on a base hit.

Of course, Wong was only on first base in the first place because Craig literally couldn’t run; his shot to right field with one out in the inning would have been a double for practically any hitter in the league. Something else that could have ruled Wong out; he seemed like a nice choice to hit for Daniel Descalso starting the ninth before Craig came to the plate. Wong had a pinch-hit single and a stolen base in the Game 3 victory, though that was his only hit in six postseason at-bats. He was still a better bet than Descalso, who was 0-for-2 tonight and 3-for-21 for the postseason. Descalso grounded out to start the frame.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.

MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”