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Miguel Cabrera, Paul Goldschmidt win the Hank Aaron Award

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ST. LOUIS — Major League Baseball just announced the winners of the 2013 Hank Aaron Award. It’s Miguel Cabrera in the AL and Paul Goldschmidt in the National League.

The award is intended to honor the best offensive performers in each league. Which, given that the MVP Award has become almost exclusively the province of hitters and given that the MVP voters have had the habit of not including defense in proper proportion, it’s a defacto hitting award too, but let’s leave that for another day.

We’ll also leave advanced metrics at the door, as the Award is voted on by a special panel of Hall of Fame players led by Aaron, with a fan voting component added on for good measure.  This is not the stuff of WAR leaders and the like.

If we are looking at offense and offense alone, and if we are looking at more traditional metrics, it’s hard to go wrong with Cabrera in the American League. He had another fantastic year, hitting .348/.442/.636 with 44 homers, 137 RBI and 90 walks. He led the league in average, on-base percentage, slugging percentage and OPS and OPS+. Same with Goldschmidt in the NL. He hit .302/.401/.551 with 36 homers, 125 RBI and 99 walks. He led the NL in homers, RBI, slugging, extra-base hits, OPS and OPS+.

Each of these two will be contenders for the MVP Award, with Cabrera likely the favorite in the AL. Advanced metrics will matter there a bit more, but probably not enough to carry the day for those who look better under said metrics’ illumination.

Tim Tebow hits a homer in his first instructional league at bat

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 20: Tim Tebow #15 of the New York Mets hits a home run at an instructional league day at Tradition Field on September 20, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Because of course he did.

It wasn’t just his first at bat, but it was his first pitch. It came off of John Kilichowski, an 11th round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals out of Vanderbilt.  The ball went out to left center, off the bat of the lefty Tebow.

Next time, meat, throw him a breaking ball.

Joaquin Benoit blames overly-sensitive hitters for benches-clearing incidents

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 12: Joaquin Benoit #53 of the Toronto Blue Jays delivers a pitch in the seventh inning during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 12, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The other night, Blue Jays reliever Joaquin Benoit needed help getting off the field after the second benches-clearing incident with the Yankees. It was later revealed that Benoit tore a calf muscle during the fracas, ending his season.

Yesterday he pointed the finger at just about everyone else for the incidents like the one that led to his injury. Hitters specifically. From The Star:

“I believe as pitchers we’re entitled to use the whole plate and pitch in if that’s the way we’re going to succeed,” Benoit said. “I believe that right now baseball is taking things so far that in some situations most hitters believe that they can’t be brushed out. Some teams take it personally.”

That “take it personally” line is interesting coming from Benoit as, in this instance, it seemed pretty clear that the whole plunking exchange which led to his injury started because Josh Donaldson took an inside pitch that did not seem to be a purpose pitch at all, too personally.

Did Benoit take a veiled swipe at his teammate here? If so, that’s pretty notable. If not it’s notable in another way, right? As it suggests that Benoit believes it’s OK for his teammates to take issue with inside pitches but anyone else who does is part of the problem?

Which is it, Joaquin?