The Giants and Marlins are under investigation for wage violations

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This is interesting:

Two Major League Baseball clubs–the San Francisco Giants and Miami Marlins—are under investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor for possible federal wage law violations. The investigations come amid wider concern about questionable pay practices throughout professional baseball, according to interviews and records obtained by FairWarning under the Freedom of Information Act.

The concern: unpaid interns who aren’t really doing intern work. Clubhouse employees who aren’t getting overtime. Stuff in that vein.

This is an expansion of the stuff we heard earlier this year about the Giants, who settled with clubhouse workers who were found to be making less than minimum wage.  According to the documents obtained, however, the government is looking at all of Major League Baseball now, and there is a suggestion that the problem is “endemic.”

There have been many cases recently in various industries concerning unpaid internships. Fashion. Publishing. Industries where scads of people compete for jobs and are willing to work for free to get their foot in the door. Some courts have found that these workers have been taken advantage of, which in turn has led to pretty significant changes in internship programs. Or, in some case, their elimination.  I have no idea whether baseball is doing things how they should be, but I will say that the dynamic in baseball is similar to that of other glamorous, high profile industries. Tons of people who want in and who will take little if anything to get their foot in the door.

Worth watching.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: