10 MLB teams valued at $1 billion or more, are the Dodgers to thank?

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Bloomberg published valuations for all 30 Major League Baseball teams, finding that the average value of a team is at $1 billion, 35% higher than previous estimates. The Yankees and Dodgers led the way of course, valued at $3.3 and $2.1 billion, respectively. But eight other teams joined them in the billion-dollar club, including the Red Sox, Mets, Cubs, Giants, Orioles, Angels, Phillies, and Rangers.

Steve Dilbeck of the L.A. Times suggests that the recent sale of the Dodgers to the Magic Johnson group for $2 billion could be a big reason why teams have seen such an increase in value. Dilbeck quotes Matt Miller, the editor of Bloomberg Billionaires:

[…] the $2-billion Dodgers sale changed everything because it “really showed that you have to value all of the assets when it comes to the teams, you can’t just do revenue from ticket sales, concessions and stadium-type deals and merchandising. Really the driver of this is regional sports networks.”

On the topic of regional sports networks, the Bloomberg article points out that of the ten billion-dollar teams, the Phillies are the only team without a regional sports network. However, they are focusing on a new contract as their current one expires in 2015.

Dustin Fowler is suing the White Sox over an outfield collision

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Tom Schuba of the Chicago Sun-Times reports that Athletics outfielder Dustin Fowler has filed suit against the White Sox for negligence. Fowler sustained a season-ending injury during a collision at Guaranteed Rate Field last June and is also bringing the lawsuit against the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority agency, as neither party took measures to secure the ballpark’s unpadded electrical box that exacerbated his injuries.

The 22-year-old outfielder was just two outs into his major league debut with the Yankees when the incident occurred. Fowler tracked a Jose Abreu foul ball down the first base line and flipped over the short railing. He was noticeably limping after colliding with a knee-high electrical box at the wall and collapsed to the ground within seconds before being carted off the field.

The official diagnosis: a ruptured patellar tendon and season-ending surgery on his right knee. Per Schuba’s report, which can be read here in full, Fowler has claimed “‘severe and permanent’ external and internal injuries, as well as mental pain and anguish” following the collision.

No specific demands have been publicized yet. Fowler is said to be seeking money from both the White Sox and the Sports Facilities Authority, likely enough to cover the “large sums” he spent on medical care for the surgery and related treatments.