Fans are shown as they enter Busch Stadium before the start of play between the Texas Rangers and the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 1 of MLB's World Series baseball championship in St. Louis

You should love the Cardinals because they uphold “strong values”

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The one thing that sorta sucks about the playoffs is how much downtime there is between games. And with downtime people kill time. And a big way to kill time in the playoffs is for fans of one team to hate on fans of another team and all of that garbage.  We see it every year.

The Braves were the early object of hate, but the Cardinals are clearly out front now. Which is not a new phenomenon. Hating on the Cardinals and their fans rarely goes too far out of style thanks to (a) their ubiquity in the playoffs in recent years; (b) the whole “Best Fans in Baseball” thing; and (c) the recent “we play the game the right way, Yasiel Puig is unprofessional” thing currently sweeping the baseball nation.

There are laughs to be had with all of that stuff and we have had our share of laughs. But it’s all kinda meaningless. It’s bad enough when people judge themselves or others by how good the team they root for is. Judging yourself or others based on your team’s fans is a step further into lunacy. News flash: someone, somewhere, hates your team and thinks it’s dumb. And maybe thinks you’re dumb for rooting for them. It’s just part of sports even if it is, well, dumb. Fact is, if someone hates you or your team it’s more likely than not because your team has done well at some point recently, so rather than get bent out of shape about it, just own it like Cartman owned Scott Tenorman’s tears.

Yet, to some folks, it’s still jarring that anyone could possibly dislike their team. Mollie Hemingway of The Federalist is a Cardinals fan. And she’s shocked, frankly:

When I told him I’m a die-hard St. Louis Cardinals fan, the mood shifted. “I loathe the Cardinals,” he said. “That’s impossible,” I replied. Nobody hates the Cardinals. We’re a well-run organization with strong values. Our fans are the best in baseball. Hating the Cardinals is like punching your mother. Even if you were tempted, you just wouldn’t do it … In a world with O.J. Simpson and Aaron Hernandez, it may be harder to uphold sports as an outgrowth of American values. But just because there’s been a breakdown in some places doesn’t mean that ball clubs that at least try to uphold values should be loathed.

Go read the whole thing. She really and truly wants to tell you why something that is inherently irrational (i.e. sports fandom and the biases it fosters) is irrational. You are wrong to hate the Cardinals, you see. She’ll explain it to you in terms of the Cardinals’ values.

Which, if you didn’t hate the Cardinals and their fans before you read that, you sure as hell do now.

Your 2016 Winter Meetings Wrapup

national-harbor
Gaylord National Resort
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OXON HILL, MD — The 2016 Winter Meetings are over.  As usual, there was still no shortage of excitement this year. More trades than we’ve seen in the past even if there are still a lot of free agents on the market. Whatever the case, it should make the rest of December a bit less sleepy than it normally is.

Let’s look back at what went down here at National Harbor this week:

Well, that certainly was a lot! I hope our coverage was useful for you as baseball buzzed through its most frantic week of the offseason. And I hope you continue coming back here to keep abreast of everything happening in Major League Baseball.

Now, get me to an airport and back home.

Eighteen players selected in the Rule 5 Draft

rule-5
MLB
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OXON HILL, MD — The Rule 5 Draft just went down here at National Harbor. As always, it was the last event of the Winter Meetings. As usual, you likely don’t know most of the players selected in the Draft, even if a couple may make a splash one day in the future.

In all, 18 players were taken in the Major League phase of the Rule 5. Here they are, with the name of the team which selected them:

Round 1
1. Twins:  Miguel Diaz, RHP, Brewers
2. Reds: Luis Torrens, C, Yankees
3. Padres: Allen Cordoba, SS, Cardinals
4. Rays: Kevin Gadea, Mariners
5. Braves: Armando Rivero, RHP, Cubs
6. D-backs: Tyler Jones, RHP, Yankees
7. Brewers: Caleb Smith, LHP, Yankees
8. Angels  Justin Haley,RHP, Red Sox
9. White Sox:  Dylan Covey, RHP, A’s
10. Pirates: Tyler Webb, LHP, Yankees
11. Tigers: Daniel Stumpf, LHP, Royals
12. Orioles: Aneury Tavarez, 2B, Red Sox
13. Blue Jays: Glenn Sparkman, RHP, Royals
14. Red Sox: Josh Rutledge, INF, Rockies
15. Indians: Holby Miller, LHP, Phillies
16. Rangers: Michael Hauschild, RHP, Astros

Round 2
17. Reds:  Stuart Turner, C, Twins
18. Orioles:  Anthony Santander, OF, Indians

For a breakdown of most of these guys and their big league prospects, check this story out at Baseball America. Like I said, you don’t know most of these guys. And, while there have been some notable exceptions in Rule 5 Draft history, most won’t make a splash in the big leagues.

Each player cost their selecting team $100,000. Each player must remain on the 25-man roster of his new club for the entire season or, at the very least, on the disabled list. If he is removed from the 25-man, the team which selected him has to offer him back to his old team for a nominal fee. Sort of like a stocking fee when you return a mattress or something. Many of these guys, of course, will not be returned and, instead, will be stashed on the DL with phantom injuries.

Aren’t transactions grand?