The time David Ortiz hit a homer with a broken wrist

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David Ortiz’s postseason heroics with the Red Sox are a huge part of how his exceptional career will be remembered, but Big Papi was hitting dramatic homers before he was Big Papi.

I stumbled across this Associated Press article from 2001, when Ortiz was a 25-year-old in his second full season with the Twins:

Minnesota Twins designated hitter David Ortiz was placed on the disabled list Saturday, a day after breaking his right wrist diving into home plate.

Ortiz was injured Friday night in the fourth inning of Minnesota’s 6-2 victory over Kansas City. One inning later, he homered into the right-field bullpen, but rounding the bases he knew the pain was more than discomfort. He then went to a hospital for X-rays. Ortiz is expected to miss six to eight weeks. …

Twins’ trainers at first thought Ortiz hurt a thumb. “We asked David maybe 90 times or 100, I’m not sure, I lost track: Are you all right?” manager Tom Kelly said. “He said he was, so we let him hit. After he hit, the trainers said his wrist was starting to swell, so we got him out of there.”

Also worth noting amid the usual (and mostly deserved) grousing about the Twins cutting Ortiz following the 2002 season: He has the fifth-highest OPS in Twins history among all hitters with at least 1,500 plate appearances through age 26–which is when he left–behind only Joe Mauer, Kent Hrbek, Justin Morneau, and Lyman Bostock.

David Ortiz wasn’t always DAVID ORTIZ, but he could always hit. Even with a broken wrist.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.