We don’t have wireless bullpen phones, but that’s a good thing


Last offseason there was a big announcement by MLB and T-Mobile about replacing the bullpen phones with a high-tech wireless system. You’ll notice, however, — as Ira Boudway of BusinessWeek did — that teams are still using the landlines. The comment from T-Mobile on the matter:

T-Mobile and MLB have been testing the In-Game Communications System in MLB non-game situations in several ballparks throughout the year and that testing is ongoing. As the In-Game Communication system is part of the field-of-play, T-Mobile and Major League Baseball agree that it is very important that before the technology is installed in ballparks for in-game use, the system needs to be game-ready. When the In-Game Communications System is game-ready, we will launch it in a couple of stadiums, to start. And then, we will roll it out to other ballparks from there.

I realize a lot of people were skeptical of the change to begin with as it appeared driven by a sponsorship relationship rather than an actual technological need. I also realize that people may, as they often to, choose to poke fun at MLB or T-Mobile for the system not being up and operating as promised. The default in most instances, actually, is to poke fun at MLB.

But really, I think this is a good moment to actually praise Major League Baseball for making sure that the game isn’t interrupted with technical issues. I’m guessing there was some pressure on them from some person with a ledger to make it happen regardless for purposes of making some T-Mobile money in ads and placement and things. That they didn’t because they’re still trying to make the system work and not screw up the on-field product is commendable.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.

MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”