The improbable continues in NLCS

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Game 1: Zack Greinke versus Joe Kelly.

Cardinals win.

Game 2: Clayton Kershaw versus Michael Wacha.

Cardinals win.

Game 3: Adam Wainwright versus Hyun_jin Ryu.

Dodgers win.

The Cardinals led the National League in runs scored both for the season as a whole and in the second half. The Dodgers started slowly, but they were third in the league in runs and second in OPS after the All-Star break. 31 innings into the NLCS, the teams have combined to scored nine runs.

And if that wasn’t unlikely enough, one of those three runs that scored tonight was charged to Cardinals reliever Kevin Siegrist. It’s the first earned run he’s allowed in three months. It’s just the second he’s surrendered in 42 innings as a major leaguer.

Finally, a fan dressed as a bear was thrown out of the ballpark tonight.

Tonight’s game could have seen the Cardinals virtually clinch the series with their ace on the mound. Wainwright allowed two runs over 16 innings in his two NLDS starts against the Pirates. Ryu gave up four rins in three innings in his NLDS loss to the Braves.

Yet, Ryu, amid rumors of elbow and back problems, came out throwing his hardest pitches of the season tonight. It’s not even an exaggeration: he hit 95 mph on the gun for the first time as a major leaguer.

Wainwright was fine, but Ryu was better. The lefty pitched seven scoreless innings, allowing three hits. It was just the second time in 32 starts this year that he went without allowing a run.

With the loss tonight, the Cardinals will definitely see Greinke again. They don’t necessarily have to win another Greinke or Kershaw start to advance, but now it’s a series, even if it’s still an incredibly odd one.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.