Francisco Cervelli

Francisco Cervelli talks about his PED use and Biogenesis

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I imagine we won’t hear from other suspended-but- largely-anonymous Biogenesis players like Sergio Escalona and Fautino De Los Santos, but Francisco Cervelli plays for the Yankees, so he’s got a somewhat higher media profile.

Cervelli spoke with Newsday yesterday and talked about his PED use and his involvement with the infamous Miami clinic. The upshot: he had a lot of injuries and he wanted to get better as soon as he could given how he always had to fight for a roster spot:

Cervelli, whose career has been beset by injuries, said his reason for involving himself with the clinic was simple. Biogenesis offered the possibility of “a quick fix,” he said, a faster return from a broken left foot suffered in March 2011 when he was battling for a backup job.

He said he was “desperate or anxious [and] scared” and listened to the wrong people’s advice in seeking out Anthony Bosch’s help.

He seems pretty honest about it all. Indeed, this pretty much sounds like any other number of PED stories we’ve heard. The need to rehab faster so the player can get back on the field. Given his candor about it and given that Cervelli was subject to mostly positive press prior to all of this (indeed, he’s extremely popular among a certain segment of Yankees fans) I have little doubt that, if his major league career resumes, most folks won’t think too much less of the guy. Indeed, like a lot of other players who served 50 games, many will forget that he was ever suspended in the first place.

We don’t do that with the superstars, though. We don’t believe them, generally speaking, when they tell the same story Cervelli tells. We assume they take PEDs for the ego or to break records or because they’re inherently bad guys and don’t buy their “I just wanted to recover from injuries faster” stories. We don’t forgive them or forget their transgression. That’s the case even though, unlike Cervelli, the Ryan Brauns and A-Rods of the world aren’t in competition for roster slots and aren’t potentially costing other players a shot at the majors as directly as a 20-25th man like Cervelli might.

Funny how that works.

Zack Greinke named the Dbacks’ Opening Day starter

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21:  Pitcher Zack Greinke #21 of the Arizona Diamondbacks poses for a portrait during photo day at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on February 21, 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Not a surprise, but a news item on a slow news day is a news item on a slow news day: Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo has named Zack Greinke as the club’s Opening Day starter.

Greinke’s first season with the Diamondbacks is not exactly what the club hoped for when he signed a six-year, $206.5 million deal in December of 2015. He dealt with oblique and shoulder issues while struggling to a 4.37 ERA over 26 starts. Greinke hasn’t pitched yet this spring, but will make his spring debut on Friday. He and the club are obviously hoping for a quiet March and a strong beginning to the season.

Either for its own sake or to increase the trade value of a player who was acquired by the previous front office regime.

“La Vida Baseball,” celebrating Latino baseball, launches

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A new website has launched. It’s called “La Vida Baseball,” and it’s all about celebrating the past, present and future of Latino baseball from a Latino perspective.

The site, produced in partnership with the Hall of Fame, has four general areas of focus:

  • Who’s Now: Focusing on current Latino players;
  • Who’s Next: Focusing on top prospects here, in the Caribbean and in Central and South America;
  • Our Life: Off-the-Field stuff, including player’s lives, lifestyles and hobbies; and
  • Our Legends: Focusing on Latino baseball history, Hall of Famers and overlooked players.

As the site has just launched there aren’t yet a ton of stories up there, but there is one about Roberto Clemente, another about Felix Hernandez and some other stuff.

The site is much-needed. Baseball reporters for American outlets are overwhelmingly white, non-Spanish speakers. Reporters, who, generally, gravitate to the players who are the most like they are. Which is understandable on some level. When you’re writing stories about people you need to be able to communicate with them and relate to them on more than a mere perfunctory level. As such, no matter how good the intentions of baseball media, we tend to see the clubhouse and the culture of baseball from a distinctly American perspective. And we tend to paint Latino players with a broad, broad brush.

La Vida Baseball will, hopefully, remedy all of that and will, hopefully, give us a fresh and insightful depiction Latino players and their culture.